WRENS   -   TROGLODYTIDAE


Scaly-breasted Wren - Microcerculus marginatus
Scaly-breasted Wren (Southern Nightingale-Wren)
Microcerculus marginatus taeniatus
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Also called Southern Nightingale-Wren. It's very widespread in neotropical lowland and foothill rainforest, where its descending flutelike song is often one of the most recognizable voices of the forest. In some areas of the Amazon it sings very differently, and it's likely more than one species is involved. This subspecies is endemic to western Ecuador, with extensive scaling; compare it with the race in the next photo, which replaces it northward. This photo was published on the cover of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in January 2014. (S8)


Scaly-breasted Wren - Microcerculus marginatus
Scaly-breasted Wren (Southern Nightingale-Wren)
Microcerculus marginatus occidentalis
El Almejal Lodge, El Valle, Chocó department, Colombia.
This subspecies is found in western Colombia and northwestern Ecuador, with very little scaling on the underparts. (S8)


Scaly-breasted Wren - Microcerculus marginatus
Scaly-breasted Wren (Southern Nightingale-Wren)
Microcerculus marginatus luscinia
Nusagandi, Comarca de Guna Yala, Panama.
I seem to be having a lot of luck with this species lately, they just jump out in front of my lens. This one rather strangely came into the open after playback of Central American Pygmy-Owl. Quite a different looking subspecies compared to the two previous photos. (S8)


Wing-banded Wren - Microcerculus bambla
Wing-banded Wren
Microcerculus bambla albigularis
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
A very local species, inexplicably absent from many areas that, at least to birders, seem totally appropriate. It occurs in some areas of the northern and western Amazon and adjacent lower Andean slopes , as well as the Tepui region. (S7)


Tooth-billed Wren - Odontorchilus cinereus
Tooth-billed Wren
Odontorchilus cinereus
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso, Brazil
A marginal shot, but I added it anyway since it is such a hard bird to photograph. It almost always sticks to the very top of the canopy in very tall forest. It's found only in relatively small area of the south-central Amazon basin. (S11)


House Wren - Troglodytes aedon
House Wren
Troglodytes aedon rex
San Lorenzo, Salta province, Argentina.
One of the widest ranging species in the entire western hemisphere. Some authorities split it into two species, Northern and Southern.  (S8)


House Wren - Troglodytes aedon
House Wren
Troglodytes aedon albicans
Old Loja-Zamora Highway, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
Ridgely and Greenfield (2001) say that all Ecuadorian birds to refer to race albicans, but other authorities such as HBW consider East Ecuador birds such as the one shown here to be clarus. I think it looks more like albicans. (S5)


Cobb's Wren - Troglodytes cobbi
Cobb's Wren
Troglodytes cobbi
Carcass Island, Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)
Endemic to the Falklands. (S8)


Cobb's Wren - Troglodytes cobbi
Cobb's Wren
Troglodytes cobbi
Carcass Island, Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)
(S8)


Ochraceous Wren - Troglodytes ochraceus
Ochraceous Wren
Troglodytes ochraceus ochraceus
Savegre Valley, San José province, Costa Rica.
Endemic to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama. It is very closely related to Mountain Wren T. solstitialis (below) of the Andes.  (S8)



Mountain Wren - Troglodytes solstitialis
Mountain Wren
Troglodytes solstitialis solstitialis
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador.
A close relative of the House Wren found in Andean cloudforest. (S5)


Mountain Wren - Troglodytes solstitialis
Mountain Wren
Troglodytes solstitialis auricularis
Parque Provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
This is the subspecies endemic to northern Argentina. It is browner and has a much whiter eyebrow than the nominate race shown in the previous photo. (S8)


Timberline Wren - Thryorchilus browni
Timberline Wren
Thryorchilus browni basultoi
Cerro de la Muerte, San José province, Costa Rica.
This wren is endemic to the highlands of Costa Rica and western Panama. (S8)


Sedge Wren - Cistothorus platensis
Sedge (Paramo) Wren
Cistothorus platensis aequatorialis
Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
There are around 20 subspecies of Sedge Wren, around half of which occur South America. Vocal differences are pretty different even between the South American taxa, and it seem likely that several distinct species are involved. Research has now been done and published in this paper; the authors recommend splitting Sedge Wren into eight species. The bird shown here would be called Paramo Wren C. aequatorialis. SACC does not yet have a proposal. (S6)


Sedge Wren - Cistothorus platensis
Sedge (Pampas) Wren
Cistothorus platensis polyglottus
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Under the new Robbins and Nyári taxonomy, this bird would be called Pampas Wren C. polyglottus polyglottus. (S6)


Sedge Wren - Cistothorus platensis
Sedge (Tucuman) Wren
Cistothorus platensis tucumanus
Quilmes, Tucumán province, Argentina.
Under the new Robbins and Nyári taxonomy, this bird would be called Tucuman Wren C. tucumanus(S8)


Sedge Wren - Cistothorus platensis
Sedge (Austral) Wren
Cistothorus platensis falklandicus
Gypsy Cove, East Falkland, Falkland Islands (Malvinas).
Under the new Robbins and Nyári taxonomy, this bird would be called Austral Wren C. hornensis falklandicus. (S8)


Apolinar's Wren - Cistothorus apolinari
Apolinar's Wren
Cistothorus apolinari
Parque La Florida, Bogotá, Colombia.
A rare and endangered Colombian endemic found in dense reedbeds on the edge of highland lakes. As long as the reeds are left intact, it can survive a lot of disturbance. I photographed this bird only about one km from the end of the runway at Bogotá´s international airport. (D3)


White-headed Wren - Campylorhynchus albobrunneus
White-headed Wren
Campylorhynchus albobrunneus harterti
Las Tangaras Reserve, El Carmen, Chocó department, Colombia.
This unique and striking wren is found only in humid forests of Panama and western Colombia. (S6)


Band-backed Wren - Campylorhynchus zonatus
Band-backed Wren
Campylorhynchus zonatus costaricensis
La Selva OTS, Heredia province, Costa Rica.
A common bird from E Mexico to W Ecuador. Northern races have richer and more extensive rufous on the belly. (S6)


Giant Wren - Campylorhynchus chiapensis
Giant Wren
Campylorhynchus chiapensis
Northeast of Mapastepec, Chiapas state, Mexico.
(S5)


Rufous-naped Wren - Campylorhynchus rufinucha
Rufous-naped Wren
Campylorhynchus rufinucha capistratus
Tárcoles, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
(S5)


Boucard's Wren - Campylorhynchus jocosus
Boucard's Wren
Campylorhynchus jocosus
Monte Alban, Oaxaca state, Mexico.
Another wren endemic to Mexico (I think there are 11). This one is found arid interior valleys of southern Mexico north and west of the Isthmus. (S5)


Fasciated Wren - Campylorhynchus fasciatus
Fasciated Wren
Campylorhynchus fasciatus pallescens
Parque El Lago, Guayas, Ecuador.
Strongly patterned and very noisy wrens found in western Ecuador and western Peru. (S8)


Fasciated Wren - Campylorhynchus fasciatus
Fasciated Wren
Campylorhynchus fasciatus pallescens
Parque El Lago, Guayas, Ecuador.
(S8)


Bicolored Wren - Campylorhynchus griseus
Bicolored Wren
Campylorhynchus griseus bicolor
RNA Reinita Cielo Azul, Santander department, Colombia.
A very bold and conspicuous wren found in Colombia and Venezuela. (S5)


Thrush-like Wren - Campylorhynchus turdinus
Thrush-like Wren
Campylorhynchus turdinus unicolor 
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
It's range includes much of the Amazon basin, the Pantanal, and the central part of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. This subspecies, found in and around the Pantanal, is rather plain compared to other races (compare with the next photo). (S6)


Thrush-like Wren - Campylorhynchus turdinus
Thrush-like Wren
Campylorhynchus turdinus hypostictus
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
(S7)


Plain-tailed Wren - Pheugopedius euophrys
Plain-tailed Wren
Pheugopedius euophrys euophrys
Reserva Geobotánica Pululahua, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This wren in completely tied to Chusquea bamboo, and is never found away from it. Pairs sing amazingly loud duets that are sometimes so perfectly timed that it's hard to tell that two birds are singing. (S8)


"Mantaro" Wren - Pheugopedius sp. nov.
"Mantaro" Wren
Pheugopedius sp. nov.
Andamarca, Junín region, Peru.
An undescribed species of wren found in the Andes of central Peru. It has been considered a form of Plain-tailed Wren, but looks and sounds quite different. (S8)


Inca Wren - Pheugopedius eisenmanni
Inca Wren
Pheugopedius eisenmanni
North side of Abra Malaga, Cusco department, Peru.
Endemic to bamboo-laden temperate forest in the Andes of southern Peru. It was only described in 1985. It usually stays hidden in bamboo thickets, but this bird came out of the bamboo in response to playback. (S6)


Moustached Wren - Pheugopedius genibarbis
Moustached Wren
Pheugopedius genibarbis genibarbis
Reserva Biológica de Saltinho, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
A widespread species in tropical South America south of the Amazon, inhabiting both humid and dry forests. (S6)


Rufous-breasted Wren - Pheugopedius rutilus
Rufous-breasted Wren
Pheugopedius rutilus hyperythrus
El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, Panama.
A beautiful little wren found in Panama, Costa Rica, northern South America, and Trinidad & Tobago. It prefers dry and semi-humid forest, and is not usually found in wet rainforest. (S8)


Banded Wren - Pheugopedius pleurostictus
Banded Wren
Pheugopedius pleurostictus acaciarum
North of Mapastepec, Chiapas state, Mexico.
A common wren of drier habitat from Mexico to Costa Rica. (S5)


Speckle-breasted Wren - Pheugopedius sclateri
Speckle-breasted Wren
Pheugopedius sclateri sclateri
El Chorro, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This wren inhabits dry and semi-humid forest from Colombia to northern Peru. The bird in this shot is of the nominate race from the Marañon drainage. (S6)


Speckle-breasted Wren - Pheugopedius sclateri
Speckle-breasted Wren
Pheugopedius sclateri paucimaculatus
Río Palenque, Los Ríos province, Ecuador.
This subspecies is found in W Ecuador and NW Peru. Compared with the one above, the black barring is not as dense, especially on the throat. which is mostly white. (S7)


Stripe-throated Wren - Cantorchilus leucopogon
Stripe-throated Wren
Cantorchilus leucopogon leucopogon
Río Canandé reserve, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
This wren is found in very wet lowland and foothill forest from eastern Panama to northwestern Ecuador. (S8)


Stripe-throated Wren - Cantorchilus leucopogon
Stripe-throated Wren
Cantorchilus leucopogon leucopogon
Río Canandé reserve, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Bay Wren - Cantorchilus nigricapillus
Bay Wren
Cantorchilus nigricapillus nigricapillus
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador
In my opinion one of the most beautiful of all the wrens; usually they are very shy and skulking, but I was lucky to have this one come right out into the open in response to playback. (S5)


Superciliated Wren - Cantorchilus superciliaris
Superciliated Wren
Cantorchilus superciliaris baroni
Chaparrí Lodge, Lambayeque department, Peru.
Endemic to the Tumbeisian region of western Ecuador and northwestern Peru. (S6)


Long-billed Wren - Cantorchilus longirostris
Long-billed Wren
Cantorchilus longirostris longirostris
Ilha Comprida, São Paulo state, Brazil.
This is the only wren endemic to eastern Brazil. It prefers areas of dense scrub and tangled secondary growth. (S8)


Long-billed Wren - Cantorchilus longirostris
Long-billed Wren
Cantorchilus longirostris bahiae
Palmeiras, Bahia state, Brazil.
The northern subspecies prefers drier habitats such as caatinga, and has a slightly different voice. (S6)


White-bellied Wren - Uropsila leucogastra
White-bellied Wren
Uropsila leucogastra musica
El Ocote Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas state, Mexico.
A monotypic genus, found from Mexico to Belize. (S5)


Rufous Wren - Cinnycerthia unirufa
Rufous Wren
Cinnycerthia unirufa unibrunnea
Cordillera de Lagunillas, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This wren inhabits high elevation forest from western Venezuela to northern Peru. It has a very beautiful song. (S6)


Sharpe's Wren - Cinnycerthia olivascens
Sharpe's Wren
Cinnycerthia olivascens olivascens
Upper Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Found in Andean cloudforest from Colombia to northern Peru. It generally occurs are lower elevations that the previous species. Often called Sepia-brown Wren. (S8)


Peruvian Wren - Cinnycerthia peruana
Peruvian Wren
Cinnycerthia peruana
Paty Trail, Carpish, Huánuco department, Peru.
Endemic to the Peruvian Andes. Some individuals have white faces (see below). (S8)


Peruvian Wren - Cinnycerthia peruana
Peruvian Wren
Cinnycerthia peruana
Villa Rica-Oxapampa road, Pasco department, Peru.
The white-faced form. (S8)


White-breasted Wood-Wren - Henicorhina leucosticta
White-breasted Wood-Wren
Henicorhina leucosticta costaricensis
La Selva OTS, Heredia province, Costa Rica.
A common and widespread bird in neotropical rainforest, found from Mexico down through the Amazon basin. (S8)


Gray-breasted Wood-Wren - Henicorhina leucophrys
Gray-breasted Wood-Wren
Henicorhina leucophrys anachoreta
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Magdalena department, Colombia.
One of the most common wrens in Neotropical mountains, but always tough to photograph due to the dark forest understory that they live in, and their usually skulking nature. Oddly enough, this one, which is currently my best shot, is of the most range-restricted subspecies, found only in high elevation forests in the Santa Marta mountains. It has a slightly different voice, which leads me to suspect that more research could show that is better considered a distinct species. (S6)


Sumichrast's Wren - Hylorchilus sumichrasti
Sumichrast's Wren
Hylorchilus sumichrasti
4 km southwest of La Joya de Santa María, Oaxaca
This wren, together with Nava's Wren, which was split from it, are endemic to southern Mexico and restricted to areas of forest that have limestone outcrops. It is mostly terrestrial. Since it is found only in very dark understory and moves a lot, I found it very challenging to photograph. This shot isn't great, but the best I could do with the gear I had at the time. (S5f)


Song Wren - Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus
Song Wren
Cyphorhinus phaeocephalus phaeocephalus
Buenaventura, El Oro province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Musician Wren - Cyphorhinus arada
Musician Wren
Cyphorhinus arada salvini
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
This rainforest floor skulker is named for its amazing song. I've included a sample below. The recording is not of this particular individual, but was recorded not too far away. (S6)


Black-capped Donacobius - Donacobius atricapilla
Black-capped Donacobius
Donacobius atricapilla atricapilla
Porto Jofre, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
One of the most distinctive and chacacteristic birds of South American wetlands. Its taxonomic affinities are still greatly debated. Currently, the SACC places it in a monotypic family, but I haven't added the new gallery yet. Pairs frequently sing and do tail-wagging displays while perched conspicuously in the open (below). (S8)


Black-capped Donacobius - Donacobius atricapilla
Black-capped Donacobius
Donacobius atricapilla atricapilla
Guaraunos, Sucre state, Venezuela.
(D3)


Black-capped Donacobius - Donacobius atricapilla
Black-capped Donacobius
Donacobius atricapilla nigrodorsalis
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos Ecuador.
(S8)

















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