TYRANT FLYCATCHERS   -   TYRANNIDAE  -  PART III

Many-colored Rush-Tyrant to Tolmomyias flycatchers


Many-colored Rush Tyrant - Tachuris rubrigastra
Many-colored Rush Tyrant
Tachuris rubrigastra libertatis
Lampa marshes, Santiago Metropolitan Region, Chile.
Without a doubt the most colorful member of the family, and ranks right up there as one of the prettiest birds of South America. It inhabits reedbeds on the edge of lakes, in coastal regions but also locally in the high Andes. This subspecies is endemic to W Peru, and is much whiter than other subspecies (compare with the next photo). (S8)


Many-colored Rush Tyrant - Tachuris rubrigastra
Many-colored Rush Tyrant
Tachuris rubrigastra rubrigastra
Lampa marshes, Santiago Metropolitan Region, Chile.
The yellower nominate race. (S5)


Sharp-tailed Tyrant - Culicivora caudacuta
Sharp-tailed Tyrant
Culicivora caudacuta
Serra da Canastra National Park, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
A unique flycatcher that requires extensive areas of undisturbed tall grassland, which means it now occurs almost exclusively withing national parks and other protected areas. (D3)


Sharp-tailed Tyrant - Culicivora caudacuta
Sharp-tailed Tyrant
Culicivora caudacuta
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
A more typical posture of this species, which usually perches upright on grass stems or small bushes. (S6)


Eared Pygmy-Tyrant - Myiornis auricularis
Eared Pygmy-Tyrant
Myiornis auricularis auricularis
Sumidouro, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A miniscule (7.5 cm) and very cute species endemic to the Atlantic Rainforest region. (S7)


White-bellied Pygmy-Tyrant - Myiornis albiventris
White-bellied Pygmy-Tyrant
Myiornis albiventris
Shaime, Zamore-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This species was only discovered in Ecuador in December 2010 by Dušan Brinkhuizen et. al. Click here for their summary.  Prior to the discovery, the species was only known from central Peru to western Bolivia. (S6)


Black-capped Pygmy-Tyrant - Myiornis atricapillus
Black-capped Pygmy-Tyrant
Myiornis atricapillus
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Male. This bird, along with Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant M. ecaudatus (which it was split from; photo below), are usually considered to be the smallest passerines in the world. They measure only about 6.5 cm (2.5 in). (S7)


Black-capped Pygmy-Tyrant - Myiornis atricapillus
Black-capped Pygmy-Tyrant
Myiornis atricapillus
Humedal de Yalare, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Female, with a gray crown instead of black. (D3)


Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant - Myiornis ecaudatus
Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant
Myiornis ecaudatus ecaudatus
Pousada Jardim da Amazonia, São José do Rio Claro, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Replaces the above species east of the Andes. These miniscule birds have very insect-like vocalizations, which seems somehow appropriate. (S7)


Northern Bentbill - Oncostoma cinereigulare
Northern Bentbill
Oncostoma cinereigulare
Carara NP, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
A strange little flycatcher found in rainforest from Mexico to Panama. In Eastern Panama and Colombia it is replaced by the very similar Southern Bentbill (below), though it may ultimately prove more logical to consider them conspecific. Northern has a gray face and throat, but there voices are very similar (S5)


Southern Bentbill - Oncostoma olivaceum
Southern Bentbill
Oncostoma olivaceum
Pipeline Road, Soberania National Park, Colón province, Panama.
(S8)


Scale-crested Pygmy-Tyrant - Lophotriccus pileatus
Scale-crested Pygmy-Tyrant
Lophotriccus pileatus squamaecrista
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador.
A common cloudforest species found from Costa Rica to Peru. (S5)


Double-banded Pygmy-Tyrant - Lophotriccus vitiosus
Double-banded Pygmy-Tyrant
Lophotriccus vitiosus affinis
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
A poor shot that I include to help document this species for the Mitú area. (S6)


Drab-breasted Pygmy-Tyrant - Hemitriccus diops
Drab-breasted Pygmy-Tyrant
Hemitriccus diops
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A bird of montane Atlantic Forest, where it is completely tied to bamboo patches. (S5f)


White-eyed Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus zosterops
White-eyed Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus zosterops zosterops
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
A fairly common species inside rainforest in the northern Amazon. (S6)


White-bellied Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus griseipectus
White-bellied Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus griseipectus naumburgae
Reserva Biológica de Saltinho, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
The Clements list incorrectly places the taxon naumburgae, which is endemic to NE Brazil, with White-eyed Tody-Tyrant H. zosterops. (S6)


Stripe-necked Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus striaticollis
Stripe-necked Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus striaticollis striaticollis
Santa Luzia do Itanhy, Sergipe state, Brazil.
This is an isolated population in eastern Brazil, occuring in Atlantic Rainforest and mangroves near the coast of Sergipe and northeastern Bahia. (S6)


Hangnest Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus nidipendulus
Hangnest Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus nidipendulus
Praia Seca, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Endemic to scrubby areas of Southeast Brazil. Most other members of the genus also build hanging nests. (S5)


Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus margaritaceiventer
Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus margaritaceiventer margaritaceiventer
Fazenda Santa Tereza (Pantanal Wildlife Center), Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
This is a rather widespread species of drier, non-forest habitats. (S6)


Zimmer's Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus minimus
Zimmer's Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus minimus
Pousada Jardim da Amazonia, São José do Rio Claro, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
A rare and local species known from scattered sites throughout the Amazon basin. It can be hard to identify unless vocalizing - this bird was, though as soon as I played back to it, it went silent, so I was unable to record it. The flight feathers appear quite dark on the folded wing, which may possibly be an ID feature. (S7)


Black-throated Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus granadensis Black-throated Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus granadensis
Black-throated Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus granadensis granadensis
Santa Barbara-La Bonita Road, Sucumbios, Ecuador.
The nominate subspecies, one of the northern group with the white face. (S5f)
Black-throated Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus granadensis pyrrhops
Tapichalaca reserve, Zamora-Chinchipe, Ecuador.
This is one of the southern subspecies, found in the eastern Andes from central Ecuador to western Bolivia. It probably deserves to be split due to its buff (not white) face and different voice. (S5)


Buff-breasted Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus mirandae
Buff-breasted Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus mirandae
Pico Alto, Serra de Baturité, Ceará state, Brazil.
Endemic to a few isolated mountain ranges in NE Brazil. (D3)


Kaempfer's Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus kaempferi
Kaempfer's Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus kaempferi
Volta Velha reserve, Itapoá, Santa Catarina state, Brazil.
Endemic to a tiny area of coastal southern Brazil. (S8)


Buff-throated Tody-Tyrant - Hemitriccus rufigularis
Buff-throated Tody-Tyrant
Hemitriccus rufigularis
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Very local in the foothills of the east slope of the Andes from Ecuador to Bolivia. (S7)


Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant - Hemitriccus furcatus
Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant
Hemitriccus furcatus
Parque Mambucaba (Perequê), Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A cute little flycatcher endemic to Southeast Brazil, where it is restricted to bamboo patches. It was formerly thought to be rare, but once its vocalizations were known better, it was found to be locally quite common. (S10)


Rufous-crowned Tody-Tyrant - Poecilotriccus ruficeps
Rufous-crowned Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus ruficeps rufigenis
Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This is the subspecies endemic to the Chocó region, mostly lacking the dark facial markings, and showing much less white on the throat. (D3)


Rufous-crowned Tody-Tyrant - Poecilotriccus ruficeps
Rufous-crowned Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus ruficeps ruficeps
Tapichalaca reserve, Zamora-Chinchipe pr., Ecuador.
The nominate race, showing typical strong facial markings. (S5)


Johnson's Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus luluae
Johnson's Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus luluae
Owlet Lodge, Abra Patricia, Amazonas region, Peru.
This species is restricted to a small area of northern Peru south of the Marañon. It is very similar to the nominate race of the previous species, and a strong argument can be made that luluae should be lumped with ruficeps. Vocally they are virtually the same. (S8)


Black-and-white Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus capitalis capitalis
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Found mostly in the far western Amazon region, and locally reaching fairly high elevations in the Andes of Ecuador. There are also some very disjunct populations in Amazonian Brazil. It shows a predilection for bamboo in the foothills, but is usually found away from it in the lowlands. (S6)


Black-and-white Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus capitalis
Black-and-white Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus capitalis capitalis
Old Loja-Zamora Highway, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
(S5)


Rusty-fronted Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus latirostris
Rusty-fronted Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus latirostris ochropterus
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Quite a widespread species through tropical South America, inhabiting both dry and humid regions. (S8)


Slate-headed Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus sylvia
Slate-headed Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus sylvia schistaceiceps
Los Pantanos, Coclé province, Panama.
(S8)


Ochre-faced Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus plumbeiceps
Ochre-faced Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus plumbeiceps plumbeiceps
Macaé de Cima, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Widespread in the Atlantic Forest region, though also occurs disjunctly in Andean cloudforests from southern Peru to northern Argentina. (S7)


Golden-winged Tody-Flycatcher - Poecilotriccus calopterus
Golden-winged Tody-Flycatcher
Poecilotriccus calopterus
Shaime, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
A very cute bird of the eastern foothills of the Andes from southern Colombia to northern Peru. (S6)


Spotted Tody-Flycatcher - Todirostrum maculatum
Spotted Tody-Flycatcher
Todirostrum maculatum signatum
Iripari Jungle Camp, Zancudococha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
This species is wide-ranging in the Amazonian and Guianan regions, but quite local. It likes young secondary forest near water, and can be especially common on river islands. (S8)


Gray-headed Tody-Flycatcher - Todirostrum poliocephalum
Gray-headed Tody-Flycatcher
Todirostrum poliocephalum
Perequê, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Endemic to Brazil, where it is a common bird in lightly wooded areas of the Atlantic Forest lowlands. Sometimes called Yellow-lored Tody-Flycatcher. (S7)


Common Tody-Flycatcher - Todirostrum cinereum
Common Tody-Flycatcher
Todirostrum cinereum cinereum
El Valle, Chocó department, Colombia.
Common and widespread, but handsome and always fun to watch. Quite fierce-looking for a bird less than four inches long! (S8)


Black-headed Tody-Flycatcher - Todirostrum nigriceps
Black-headed Tody-Flycatcher
Todirostrum nigriceps
Chiriqui Grande, Bocas del Toro province, Panama.
A handsome bird found in rainforest canopy from Costa Rica to northwestern South America west of the Andes. (S8)


Yellow-browed Tody-Flycatcher - Todirostrum chrysocrotaphum
Yellow-browed Tody-Flycatcher
Todirostrum chrysocrotaphum guttatum
Sacha Lodge, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Digiscoped from the tree tower, where it was building a nest. This has heavier streaking on the throat compared to other races. (D3)


Brownish Twistwing - Cnipodectes subbrunneus
Brownish Twistwing
Cnipodectes subbrunneus minor
Trail between Rio Aguarico and Zancudococha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. A large flycatcher of the rainforest understory. The name comes from the twisted primary feathers that are used to produce a loud whirring sound during display flights. (S8)


Brownish Twistwing - Cnipodectes subbrunneus
Brownish Twistwing
Cnipodectes subbrunneus minor
Trail between Rio Aguarico and Zancudococha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. Flinging a wing up over his back - a common behavior of this species. (S8)


Eye-ringed Flatbill - Rhynchocyclus brevirostris
Eye-ringed Flatbill
Rhynchocyclus brevirostris brevirostris
Sierra de las Tuxtlas, Veracruz state, Mexico.
The eye-ring is not obvious here, but the flatbill certainly is... (S5f)


Olivaceous Flatbill - Rhynchocyclus olivaceus
Olivaceous Flatbill
Rhynchocyclus olivaceus bardus
Panama Rainforest Discovery Center, Colón province, Panama.
This is a widespread species in neotropical lowland rainforest. (S8)


Olivaceous Flatbill - Rhynchocyclus olivaceus
Olivaceous Flatbill
Rhynchocyclus olivaceus flavus
Cañón de Río Claro, Doradal, Antioquia department, Colombia.
This bird was actively building a nest next to a river. It was a long, hanging nest reminiscent of the nest of a cacique. (S6)


Pacific Flatbill - Rhynchocyclus pacificus
Pacific Flatbill
Rhynchocyclus pacificus
Parque Nacional Natural La Ensenada de Utría, Chocó department, Colombia.
The difficult lighting conditions made this a tough shot, but it's still pretty neat, since you can really appreciate the shape of the bill. I suspect the bird on the left is a juvenile from the obvious gape. (S8)


Fulvous-breasted Flatbill - Rhynchocyclus fulvipectus
Fulvous-breasted Flatbill
Rhynchocyclus fulvipectus
Chinapinza, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This species is widespread in middle-elevation Andean cloudforest, but always seems to be scarce. (S6)


Yellow-olive Flycatcher - Tolmomyias sulphurescens
Yellow-olive Flycatcher
Tolmomyias sulphurescens peruvianus
Old Loja-Zamora Highway, Loja province, Ecuador.
A widespread neotropical bird, though were probably going to see some splitting here in the future. (S5)


Yellow-olive Flycatcher - Tolmomyias sulphurescens
Yellow-olive Flycatcher
Tolmomyias sulphurescens pallescens
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
(S11)


Yellow-margined Flycatcher - Tolmomyias assimilis
Yellow-margined Flycatcher
Tolmomyias assimilis flavotectus
Trail between El Valle and Utría National Park, Chocó department, Colombia.
(S8)
















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