TYRANT FLYCATCHERS   -   TYRANNIDAE   -   PART I

Phyllomyias tyrannulets to Mecocerculus tyrannulets

Rough-legged Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias burmeisteri
Rough-legged Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias burmeisteri burmeisteri
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
The various races of this widespread species are sometimes split off. This is the nominate race, found from Bolivia to SE Brazil. The white base to the lower mandible is a useful ID feature. (S7)


Greenish Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias virescens
Greenish Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias virescens
Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A poor shot of a very hard-to-photograph canopy species, a scarce Atlantic Rainforest endemic. It's similar to a few other sympatric congeners, but is generally much brighter yellow below, brighter greenish above, and has a longer tail. (S7)


Sclater's Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias sclateri
Sclater's Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias sclateri sclateri
Parque provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
Found in forest on lower Andean slopes from SE Peru to NW Argentina. (S8)


Sclater's Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias sclateri
Sclater's Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias sclateri subtropicalis
Aguas Calientes, Cusco department, Peru.
(S6)


Planalto Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias fasciatus
Planalto Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias fasciatus brevirostris
Intervales State Park, São Paulo state, Brazil.
The most common and widespread Phyllomyias in the Atlantic Rainforest region, and a good basis for comparison with others of the same, often confusing, genus. (S7)


Sooty-headed Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias griseiceps
Sooty-headed Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias griseiceps
Mangaloma reserve, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Now considered monotypic. The birds in W Ecuador sing a different song than those elsewhere in it's range; it could merit some investigation. (S6)


Ashy-headed Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias cinereiceps
Ashy-headed Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias cinereiceps
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This small flycatcher is fairly common but easy to overlook; it's found in Andean cloudforest in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. (S8)


Tawny-rumped-Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias uropygialis
Tawny-rumped-Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias uropygialis
Reserva Geobotánica Pululahua, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
It has a very similar range as the Black-capped in the previous shot, but overall is much scarcer. (S8)


Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias plumbeiceps
Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias plumbeiceps
Afluente, San Martín region, Peru.
This bird is quite scarce in foothill cloudforest along the east slope of the Andes in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. It can be hard to identify if not vocalizing (this bird was), but the short, stubby bill and blurry (not crisp) wingbars are good features to look for. (S8)


Gray-capped Tyrannulet - Phyllomyias griseocapilla
Gray-capped Tyrannulet
Phyllomyias griseocapilla
Macaé de Cima, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Endemic to the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil. The yellow flanks that contrast with gray underparts are a good ID feature. (S6)


Yellow-crowned Tyrannulet - Tyrannulus elatus
Yellow-crowned Tyrannulet
Tyrannulus elatus
Trail between Rio Aguarico and Zancudococha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
A widespread Neotropical rainforest flycatcher. The yellow crown is usually hidden. (S8)


Gray Elaenia - Myiopagis caniceps
Gray Elaenia
Myiopagis caniceps caniceps
Carlos Botelho State Park, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Female. (S8)


Pacific Elaenia - Myiopagis subplacens
Pacific Elaenia
Myiopagis subplacens
Río Ayampe, Manabí province, Ecuador.
Endemic to the Tumbesian region of W Ecuador and NW Peru, where it is common in dry woodland and forest. (S8)


Greenish Elaenia - Myiopagis viridicata
Greenish Elaenia
Myiopagis viridicata placens
La Soledad, Oaxaca state, Mexico.
(S5)


Yellow-bellied Elaenia - Elaenia flavogaster
Yellow-bellied Elaenia
Elaenia flavogaster subpagana
Las Guacamayas, Chiapas state, Mexico.
Elaenias can be one of the biggest identification problems in South America. This one is probably the most common and widespread of the genus, and usually one of the easier ones, but can also be difficult when in worn plumage and not vocalizing. (S5)


Yellow-bellied Elaenia - Elaenia flavogaster
Yellow-bellied Elaenia
Elaenia flavogaster pallididorsalis
Los Pantanos, Coclé province, Panama.
(S8)


White-crested Elaenia - Elaenia albiceps
White-crested Elaenia
Elaenia albiceps griseigularis
Nono, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
(S8)


White-crested Elaenia - Elaenia albiceps
White-crested (Chilean) Elaenia
Elaenia albiceps chilensis
Garibaldi Pass, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
This subspecies is often considered a distinct species, "Chilean Elaenia" (e.g. IOC). It is highly migratory, breeding in southern South American, and moving north in the austral winter. (S8)


Small-billed Elaenia - Elaenia parvirostris
Small-billed Elaenia
Elaenia parvirostris
San Lorenzo, Salta province, Argentina.
Breeds in woodland in southern South America, but spends the winter into the Amazon. (S6)


Olivaceous Elaenia - Elaenia mesoleuca
Olivaceous Elaenia
Elaenia mesoleuca
Algulhas Negras road, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Endemic to the Atlantic Rainforest, where it prefers edge of scrubby woodland and scrubby clearings. Not a particularly distinctive species - when not vocalizing (and this bird was), it can be tough to ID with certainty. (S6)


Slaty Elaenia - Elaenia strepera
Slaty Elaenia
Elaenia strepera
Rio Sosa, Tucumán province, Argentina.
Perhaps the easiest Elaenia to identify thanks to its predominantly gray plumage. It is a long distance migrant, breeding in the Andes of southern Bolivia and northern Argentina in the austral summer, and wintering mainly in Venezuela. (D3)


Mottle-backed Elaenia - Elaenia gigas
Mottle-backed Elaenia
Elaenia gigas
Cabañas Yankuam, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
One of the most distinctive and easiest to identify of all the elaenias, with it's double crest split by a fan of white feathers. It is found in the eastern Amazon and in the adjacent Andean foothills. (S6)


Plain-crested Elaenia - Elaenia cristata
Plain-crested Elaenia
Elaenia cristata cristata
Gran Sabana, Bolívar state, Venezuela.
A specialist in low, scrubby savannas. The well-defined, dark, triangular crest is usually distinctive. (D3)


Highland Elaenia - Elaenia obscura
Highland Elaenia
Elaenia obscura sordida
Chapada de Diamantina, Bahia state, Brazil.
A poorly-named species, as it can occur all the way down to sea level in Brazil. Shape is a very helpful ID feature, with a very small head relative to its body size, and a round head that usually doesn't show much of a crest. (D3)


Highland Elaenia - Elaenia obscura
Highland Elaenia
Elaenia obscura obscura
Parque provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
(S8)


Yellow-bellied Tyrannulet - Ornithion semiflavum
Yellow-bellied Tyrannulet
Ornithion semiflavum
Campamento La Jungla, Catemaco, Veracruz state, Mexico.
This genus is typically high in the canopy and very tough to photograph. This little guy came down amazingly low and close in response to playback. (S5f)


Brown-capped Tyrannulet - Ornithion brunneicapillus
Brown-capped Tyrannulet
Ornithion brunneicapillus
Río Silanche Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A rainforest species of Central America and NW South America. The white eyebrow and plain wings are far more obvious than the brown cap. (S8)


White-lored Tyrannulet - Ornithion inerme
White-lored Tyrannulet
Ornithion inerme
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
(S6)


Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet - Camptostoma obsoletum
Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet
Camptostoma obsoletum sclateri
Olmedo, Santa Elena province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Suiriri Flycatcher - Suiriri suiriri
Suiriri Flycatcher
Suiriri suiriri (ssp?)
Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
With the recent taxonomic upheaval in this genus (see below), I am unsure what subspecies to assign this bird to. (S5f)


Chapada Flycatcher - Suiriri affinis
Chapada Flycatcher
Suiriri affinis
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Chapada Flycatcher species was described in 2001 as S. islerorum, however it was later found that the type specimen of S. s. affinis was actually the same thing, therefore that name took priority. Note the pale tips to the tail feathers, a good feature to distinguish it from the similar Suiriri Flycatcher S. suiriri (above). This photo was published in the first edition of Neotropical Birding. (D3)


Chapada Flycatcher - Suiriri affinis
Chapada Flycatcher
Suiriri affinis
Near Três Marias, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Another angle of a different bird in a spot towards the eastern limit of its known range. (S5)


Chapada Flycatcher - Suiriri affinis
Chapada Flycatcher
Suiriri affinis
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
(S11)


White-tailed Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus poecilocercus
White-tailed Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus poecilocercus
Tandayapa, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
(S7)


Buff-banded Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus hellmayri
Buff-banded Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus hellmayri
Parque provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
Restricted to the yungas forests of southern Bolivia and northwestern Argenina. (S8)


White-banded Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus stictopterus
White-banded Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus stictopterus stictopterus
Reserva Geobotánica Pululahua, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A common Andean species, replacing White-tailed Tyrannulet (previous) at higher elevations where they occur together. The two are fairly similar in plumage, but this species has pure white wingbard and lacks the white in the undertail. (S6)


White-throated Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus leucophrys
White-throated Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus leucophrys leucophrys
Calilegua NP, Jujuy province, Argentina.
A typical Andean flycatcher, occuring from Venezuela all the way to northern Argentina. There is a far amount of racial variation in this species, especially in the color of the wingbard. Compare the white wingbars of the nominate race here with the photos below. (S5)


White-throated Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus leucophrys White-throated Tyrannulet - Mecocerculus leucophrys
White-throated Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus leucophrys rufomarginatis
Papallacta Pass, Napo province, Ecuador.
This is one of the races with rufous wingbars, which can be seen quite well in the bird on the right. (S5)
White-throated Tyrannulet
Mecocerculus leucophrys rufomarginatis
Yanacocha, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
(S5)



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