TOUCANS   -   RAMPHASTIDAE


Toco Toucan - Ramphastos toco
Toco Toucan
Ramphastos toco albogularis
Santa Teresa (Pantanal lodge), Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
The largest toucan, and it has become symbolic of the family (e.g. Guinness beer). It was visiting a feeder at the lodge and playing with its food... (S6)


Toco Toucan - Ramphastos toco
Toco Toucan
Ramphastos toco albogularis
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
The late afternoon sunlight caught his amazing bill and made it glow. (D3)


Black-mandibled (Chestnut-mandibled) Toucan - Ramphastos ambiguus swainsonii
Black-mandibled (Chestnut-mandibled) Toucan
Ramphastos ambiguus swainsonii
Río Canandé Reserve, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Until recently this race was considered a distinct monotypic species, Chestnut-mandibled Toucan. (S8)


Red-billed (White-throated) Toucan - Ramphastos tucanus tucanus
White-throated Toucan
Ramphastos tucanus tucanus
Caño Colorado, Monagas state, Venezuela.
Another toucan species that has seen a major taxonomic revision in recent years. This is the nominate red-billed race from NE South America, formerly split off as Red-billed Toucan. (D3)


Keel-billed Toucan - Ramphastos sulfuratus
Keel-billed Toucan
Ramphastos sulfuratus brevicarinatus
Canopy Lodge, El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, Panama.
Sometimes called Rainbow-billed Toucan, a far better name in my opinion. It is widespread in lowlands rainforest from southern Mexico to northwestern Venezuela. (S8)


Choco Toucan - Ramphastos brevis
Choco Toucan
Ramphastos brevis
Río Silanche Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Channel-billed Toucan - Ramphastos vitellinus
Channel-billed Toucan
Ramphastos vitellinus culminatus
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
This widespread South American species is sometimes split up due to significant plumage differences - compare with the next shot. When separated, the one in this shot is called Yellow-ridged Toucan R. culminatus. (S8)


Channel-billed Toucan - Ramphastos vitellinus
Channel-billed Toucan
Ramphastos vitellinus ariel
Rio de Janiero Botanical Gardens, Brazil.
This is one of the more colorful subspecies, found in much of Brazil south of the Amazon. Plumage is similar to R. dicolorus below, but is easily separated by bill coloration. If split, it is called Ariel Toucan R. ariel. (S6)


Red-breasted Toucan - Ramphastos dicolorus
Red-breasted Toucan
Ramphastos dicolorus
Hotel do Ypê, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A gaudy toucan from SE South America. It occurs mainly in the Atlantic Forest, but does occur locally outside it. (S6)


Red-breasted Toucan - Ramphastos dicolorus
Red-breasted Toucan
Ramphastos dicolorus
Hotel do Ypê, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Another shot, this time looking down on it from the balcony of the hotel. (D3)


Emerald Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus
Emerald Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus griseigularis
Dusky Stafrontlet Reserve, Antioquia department, Colombia.
There is a huge amount of racial variation in this species, and many ornithologists believe that some of the races deserve full species status. SACC has not really addressed the issue yet. This is one of the Andean subspecies from the north end of the Colombian western Andes. (S5)


Emerald Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus
Emerald Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus albivitta
El Rancho de Jairo (restaurant), Km 31 Mosquera-La Mesa highway, Cundinamarca, Colombia.
(S8)


Emerald Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus
Emerald Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus virescens
Tacaná Volcano, Chiapas state, Mexico.
(S5)


Emerald (Blue-throated) Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus caeruleogularis
Emerald (Blue-throated) Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus caeruleogularis
Monteverde, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
This race is endemic to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama. (D3)


Emerald (Santa Marta) Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus lautus
Emerald (Santa Marta) Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus lautus
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Colombia.
Another of the potential splits, this one endemic to the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta of northeastern Colombia. The yellow on the upper mandible is much reduced. (D3)


Emerald Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus prasinus
Emerald (Wagler's) Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus prasinus wagleri
Pluma Hidalgo, Oaxaca, Mexico.
Yet another subspecies that is sometimes split. This one is restricted to the Sierra Madre del Sur of southern Mexico. (S13)


Groove-billed Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus sulcatus
Groove-billed Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus sulcatus calorhynchus
Santa Marta mountains, Magdalena dept., Colombia.
This is the yellow-billed race, sometimes treated as a separate species, A. calorhynchus. (D3)


Chestnut-tipped Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus derbianus
Chestnut-tipped Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus derbianus derbianus
Old Loja-Zamora highway, Zamora-Chinchipe prov., Ecuador.
I'm not sure if it is named after the color of the tip of the bill or the tip of the tail. It has a disjunct range along the east slope of the Andes and in the tepui region. (D3)


Crimson-rumped Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus haematopygus
Crimson-rumped Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus haematopygus sexnotatus
Refugio Paz de laz Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador
Yet another of the many green toucanets in the neotropics. This one is best told by the extensive chestnut on the bill. (S8)


Blue-banded Toucanet - Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis
Blue-banded Toucanet
Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis
Villa Rica-Oxapampa road, Pasco department, Peru.
This toucanet is found in east slope cloudforest in Peru and Bolivia. (S8)


Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan - Andigena hypoglauca
Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan
Andigena hypoglauca lateralis
Apalla, Junín region, Peru.
This spectacular toucan inhabits high Andean temperate forest from Colombia to Peru. (S8)


Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan - Andigena hypoglauca
Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan
Andigena hypoglauca lateralis
Apalla, Junín region, Peru.
Eating a huge beetle. (S8)


Plate-billed Mountain-Toucan - Andigena laminirostris
Plate-billed Mountain-Toucan
Andigena laminirostris
Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Nearly endemic to Ecuador, only barely reaching across the Colombian border. This is the bird on the cover of the Ridgely & Greenfield field guide. (D3)


Black-billed Mountain-Toucan - Andigena nigrirostris
Black-billed Mountain-Toucan
Andigena nigrirostris spilorynchus
Cosanga River road, Napo province, Ecuador.
(D3)


Black-billed Mountain-Toucan - Andigena nigrirostris
Black-billed Mountain-Toucan
Andigena nigrirostris occidentalis
Above Jardín, Antioquia department, Colombia.
Differs from the race in the previous shot mainly by the red patch at the base of the lower mandible. (D3)


Yellow-eared-Toucanet - Selenidera spectabilis
Yellow-eared-Toucanet
Selenidera spectabilis
Braulio Carrillo NP, Heredia province, Costa Rica.
Female. (D3)


Golden-collared Toucanet - Selenidera reinwardtii
Golden-collared Toucanet
Selenidera reinwardtii reinwardtii
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. (S7)


Golden-collared Toucanet - Selenidera reinwardtii
Golden-collared Toucanet
Selenidera reinwardtii reinwardtii
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Female. (S6)


Tawny-tufted Toucanet - Selenidera nattereri
Tawny-tufted Toucanet
Selenidera nattereri
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. Some poor, distant shots of this rarely-seen toucan, which is restricted to parts of eastern Colombia, southern Venezuela, and northwestern Brazil. The blue spots at the base of the bill and the yellow tip distinguish it from the similar Golden-collared Toucanet. Some sources make out that this species has vertical black stripes on the bill, but these birds clearly don't have them. (S6)


Gould's Toucanet - Selenidera gouldii
Gould's Toucanet
Selenidera gouldii
Serra de Baturité, Ceará state, Brazil.
Male. This individual is from the isolated population in NE Brazil, where it lives in rather dry forest. The main population lives in rainforest in the southern and eastern Amazon. (D3)


Spot-billed Toucanet - Selenidera maculirostris
Spot-billed Toucanet
Selenidera maculirostris
Macaé de Cima, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Mainly an Atlantic Forest endemic, but it does apparently live in gallery forest near the edges of its range. (D3)


Spot-billed Toucanet - Selenidera maculirostris
Spot-billed Toucanet
Selenidera maculirostris
Macaé de Cima, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A pair. The female is on the left. (S6)


Green Aracari - Pteroglossus viridis
Green Aracari
Pteroglossus viridis
Imitaca Forest (Rio Grande), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Male. This species occurs mainly on the Guianan Shield of nothern South America. (D3)


Lettered Aracari - Pteroglossus inscriptus
Lettered Aracari
Pteroglossus inscriptus humboldti
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Female. She is drinking out of a hollow created by a broken branch. (S6)


Red-necked Aracari - Pteroglossus bitorquatus
Red-necked Aracari
Pteroglossus bitorquatus sturmii
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. (S8)


Ivory-billed Aracari - Pteroglossus azara
Ivory-billed Aracari
Pteroglossus azara flavirostris
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Female. (S6)


Black-necked Aracari - Pteroglossus aracari
Black-necked Aracari
Pteroglossus aracari roraimae/atricollis
El Dorado, Bolívar state, Venezuela
Differs from the nominate by the more obvious culmen stripe and chestnut ear coverts. Race roraimae was not recognized by HBW 7. (D3)


Chestnut-eared Aracari - Pteroglossus castanotis
Chestnut-eared Aracari
Pteroglossus castanotis australis
Pantanal Mato Grosso Hotel, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
One of the most widespread of the aracaris, found throughout most of interior tropical South America. (S8)


Many-banded Aracari - Pteroglossus pluricinctus
Many-banded Aracari
Pteroglossus pluricinctus
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
A funny name, but I suppose that relative to the aracaris that have only one band, two might be considered "many"... This species is widespread and often common in the northwestern part of the Amazon basic. (S11)


Collared Aracari - Pteroglossus torquatus
Collared Aracari
Pteroglossus torquatus torquatus
Canopy Lodge, El Valle de Antón, Coclé province, Panama.
This species is wide ranging in Central America and northern South America. Compare the bill pattern of the various subspecies, some of which were formerly split off as separate species. (S8)


Collared Aracari - Pteroglossus torquatus
Collared (Pale-mandibled) Aracari
Pteroglossus torquatus erythropygius
Río Silanche Bird Sancturary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This subspecies, which is virtually endemic to Ecuador, is sometimes given full species status due to the mostly pale lower mandible. (S8)


Collared (Stripe-billed) Aracari - Pteroglossus torquatus
Collared (Stripe-billed) Aracari
Pteroglossus torquatus sanguineus
Trail between El Valle and Parque Nacional Utría, Chocó department, Colombia.
Another subspecies that is sometimes split, with a nearly all black lower mandible and a black stripe on the upper mandible. It lives in lowland rainforest from eastern Panama to extreme northwestern Ecuador. (S8)


Collared Aracari - Pteroglossus torquatus
Collared Aracari
Pteroglossus torquatus nuchalis
Reserva El Paujil, Santander department, Colombia.
This subspecies is found in northeastern Colombia and northern Venezuela. The white line at the base of the bill is thicker and the "teeth" on the upper mandible are larger. I think the one on the right is the male, since it's bill seems longer. They were going to roost in that hole, it didn't appear to be a nest. (D3)


Fiery-billed Aracari - Pteroglossus frantzii
Fiery-billed Aracari
Pteroglossus frantzii
Talari Mountain Lodge, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
An aracari with a rather small range, on the Pacific slope of SW Costa Rica and W Panama. (S8)


Curl-crested Aracari - Pteroglossus beauharnaesii
Curl-crested Aracari
Pteroglossus beauharnaesii
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Gross state, Brazil.
(D3)



Saffron Toucanet - Pteroglossus bailloni
Saffron Toucanet
Pteroglossus bailloni
Hotel do Ypê, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Sex uncertain; the short bill is more typical of a female, but it has the brighter plumage more characteristic of a male. A unique toucan, often (and probably better) placed in its own monotypic genus Baillonius, since it really doesn't look like anything else. (D2)



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