TANAGERS   -   THRAUPIDAE   -   PART IV

Swallow Tanager to Bananaquit

Swallow Tanager - Tersina viridis
Swallow Tanager
Tersina viridis grisescens
Sierra de Santa Marta, Magdalena dept., Colombia.
Male. (S5)


Black-faced Dacnis - Dacnis lineata
Black-faced Dacnis
Dacnis lineata lineata
Hostería Arrayán y Piedra, Macas, Morona-Santiago province, Ecuador.
Male. This is the widespread nominate race of Amazonia. (S5)


Yellow-bellied Dacnis - Dacnis flaviventer
Yellow-bellied Dacnis
Dacnis flaviventer
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. The color combination makes it totally unique among dacnises, and I've always wondered if it might best be separated as a monotypic genus. It's a common species of the western Amazon. (S6)


Yellow-bellied Dacnis - Dacnis flaviventer
Yellow-bellied Dacnis
Dacnis flaviventer
Near Garzacocha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
A pair. (S8)


Turquoise Dacnis - Dacnis hartlaubi
Turquoise Dacnis
Dacnis hartlaubi
Laguna Pedro Palo, Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Male. A very localized Colombian endemic. The reason for it's rarity is poorly known since it is not a bird of primary forest. This one was in a stand of trees next to a pasture. (S8)


Scarlet-thighed Dacnis - Dacnis venusta
Scarlet-thighed Dacnis
Dacnis venusta venusta
Lake Fortuna-Gualaca road, Chiriqui province, Panama.
Male. The scarlet thighs are pretty hard to see under most conditions. (S8)


Blue Dacnis - Dacnis cayana
Blue Dacnis
Dacnis cayana paraguayensis
Folha Seca, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Male. A common and widespread species. It is found in virtually all of tropical South America, as well as southern Central America. (S6)


Blue Dacnis - Dacnis cayana
Blue Dacnis
Dacnis cayana paraguayensis
Folha Seca, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Female. (S8)


Shining Honeycreeper - Cyanerpes lucidus
Shining Honeycreeper
Cyanerpes lucidus isthmicus
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama
Male. A rainforest species found from southern Mexico to northwestern Colombia. (S8)


Shining Honeycreeper - Cyanerpes lucidus
Shining Honeycreeper
Cyanerpes lucidus isthmicus
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama
Female. (S8)


Purple Honeycreeper - Cyanerpes caeruleus
Purple Honeycreeper
Cyanerpes caeruleus microrhynchus
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. Extremely similar to Shining Honeycreeper (above), which it replaces in South America, with a small area of overlap in E Panama and NW Colombia. (S11)


Red-legged Honeycreeper - Cyanerpes cyaneus
Red-legged Honeycreeper
Cyanerpes cyaneus carneipes
Arenal Observatory Lodge, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
Male. I photoshopped a branch out from behind the bird and didn't do a great job, probably should redo it but I really hate that kind of work and only do it when absolutely necessary. (S8)


Red-legged Honeycreeper - Cyanerpes cyaneus
Red-legged Honeycreeper
Cyanerpes cyaneus pacificus
Parque Nacional Natural La Ensenada de Utría, Chocó department, Colombia.
Female. (S8)


Green Honeycreeper - Chlorophanes spiza
Green Honeycreeper
Chlorophanes spiza axillaris
Folha Seca, Ubatuba, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Male. A common an widespreads species in Neotropical lowlands rainforest. It occurs from southern Mexico south to SE Brazil. (S6)


Green Honeycreeper - Chlorophanes spiza
Green Honeycreeper
Chlorophanes spiza axillaris
Folha Seca, Ubatuba, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Female. (D6)


Scarlet-browed Tanager - Heterospingus xanthopygius
Scarlet-browed Tanager
Heterospingus xanthopygius berliozi
El Valle, Chocó department, Colombia.
Male. This distinctive tanager is found in humid lowland and foothill forest from eastern Panama to northwestern Ecuador. It has a yellow patch on the rump, but that feature his hidden by the wings in this photo. (S8)


Guira Tanager - Hemithraupis guira
Guira Tanager
Hemithraupis guira guirina
Mirador Rio Blanco, San Miguel de Los Bancos, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. I overexposed the shot because I forgot to change my exposure compensation back from the previous photo, which was of a backlit subject. I've fixed it up as best I could but this was definitely a lost opportunity! (S6)


Yellow-backed Tanager - Hemithraupis flavicollis
Yellow-backed Tanager
Hemithraupis flavicollis insignis
Guapi Assu Bird Lodge, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. This is the only place I know where this tanager comes to feeders. It's a hard bird to photograph otherwise, since it sticks to the forest canopy. This species is found mainly in the Amazon, with isolated populations in the Atlantic Rainforest and in NW Colombia & adjacent Panama. (S5)


Scarlet-and-white Tanager - Chrysothlypis salmoni
Scarlet-and-white Tanager
Chrysothlypis salmoni
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
A scarce and local species of very wet rainforest in the Chocó region of NW Ecuador and W Colombia. Photos of the female in the wild are rare indeed, and I wasn't able to find any others when I looked. A shot of the male is below. (S8)


Scarlet-and-white Tanager - Chrysothlypis salmoni
Scarlet-and-white Tanager
Chrysothlypis salmoni
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Chestnut-vented Conebill - Conirostrum speciosum
Chestnut-vented Conebill
Conirostrum speciosum speciosum
Guapi Assu Bird Lodge, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. (S6)


Blue-backed Conebill - Conirostrum sitticolor
Blue-backed Conebill
Conirostrum sitticolor cyaneum
Abra Barro Negro, Amazonas department, Peru.
A beautiful bird of temperate Andean forest from Venezuela to Bolivia. It is almost always encountered following mixed species flocks. (S6)


Capped Conebill - Conirostrum albifrons
Capped Conebill
Conirostrum albifrons atrocyaneum
Upper Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. This pretty bird is often hard to appreciate; it moves in canopy flocks and can look totally black in bad lighting conditions. It's in found in cloudforest through much of the Andes as well as the coastal range of Venezuela. (S8)


Cinereous Conebill - Conirostrum cinereum
Cinereous Conebill
Conirostrum cinereum fraseri
Papallacta, Napo province, Ecuador.
Seems to replace the next species from southern Colombia southward. (S6)


Rufous-browed Conebill - Conirostrum rufum
Rufous-browed Conebill
Conirostrum rufum
Chingaza NP, Cundinamarca dept, Colombia.
Almost a Colombian endemic; it barely reaches Venezuela. It lives in scrub and stunted forest around the edge of the páramo. (S6)


Tamarugo Conebill - Conirostrum tamarugense
Tamarugo Conebill
Conirostrum tamarugense
Chaca Valley, Region I, Chile.
This is a neat little bird restricted to arid areas of northern Chile and extreme southern Peru. (S5)


White-browed Conebill - Conirostrum ferrugineiventre
White-browed Conebill
Conirostrum ferrugineiventre
North side of Abra Malaga, Cusco department, Peru.
A very pretty conebill found in high elevation Andean forests in Peru and Bolivia. (S6)


Giant Conebill - Oreomanes fraseri
Giant Conebill
Oreomanes fraseri
El Cajas National Park, Azuay province, Ecuador.
Inhabits Polylepis woodland at very high elevations in the Andes, usually not found any lower than about 3500 meters/11500 feet. (S7)


Slaty Flowerpiercer - Diglossa plumbea
Slaty Flowerpiercer
Diglossa plumbea plumbea
Savegre Mountain Hotel, San José province, Costa Rica.
Male. (S5)


Slaty Flowerpiercer - Diglossa plumbea
Slaty Flowerpiercer
Diglossa plumbea plumbea
Savegre Mountain Hotel, San José province, Costa Rica.
Female. (S8)


Glossy Flowerpiercer - Diglossa lafresnayii
Glossy Flowerpiercer
Diglossa lafresnayii
Papallacta, Napo province, Ecuador.
A common bird in the highest temperates forest just below treeline. It's found in the northern Andes from Venezuela to extreme North Peru. (S6)


Black Flowerpiercer - Diglossa humeralis
Black Flowerpiercer
Diglossa humeralis aterrima
Quito-Nono road, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This subspecies, occuring from central Colombia to northern Peru, has no white on the shoulder; this makes it much easier to separate from the previous species. (S7)


Black-throated Flowerpiercer - Diglossa brunneiventris
Black-throated Flowerpiercer
Diglossa brunneiventris brunneiventris
Bosque Unchog, Huánuco department, Peru.
A handsome flowerpiercer found in the Andes from Peru to Bolivia and northern Chile. There is also an isolated population in western Colombia. (S8)


White-sided Flowerpiercer - Diglossa albilatera
White-sided Flowerpiercer
Diglossa albilatera albilatera
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Magdalena dept., Colombia.
Female. An interesting shot showing a flowerpiercer "caught in the act". She uses her hooked bill to pierce the base of the flower, and then sucks the nectar out - nectar that would be very hard or impossible for her to get out any other way. (S6)


Indigo Flowerpiercer - Diglossa indigotica
Indigo Flowerpiercer
Diglossa indigotica
Mashpi road, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A localized Chocó endemic, found in the Andes of western Colombia and northwestern Ecuador. (S6)


Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer - Diglossa baritula
Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer
Diglossa baritula
Cerro Huitepec, San Cristóbal, Chiapas, Mexico
Male. The most northern flowerpiercer ranging in Mexico and northern Central America. (S13)


Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer - Diglossa baritula
Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer
Diglossa baritula
Cerro Huitepec, San Cristóbal, Chiapas, Mexico
Female. (S13)


Rusty Flowerpiercer - Diglossa sittoides
Rusty Flowerpiercer
Diglossa sittoides sittoides
La Cuesta del Obispo, Salta province, Argentina.
Male. I think this is the most widespread species of flowerpiercer. It can be found in mountains from northern Venezuela south to northern Argentina. In areas where other species of flowerpiercer occur, Rusties seem to perfer drier habitats such as rainshadow valleys. (S6)


Rusty Flowerpiercer - Diglossa sittoides
Rusty Flowerpiercer
Diglossa sittoides decorata
About 10km southeast of Pifo, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Rusty Flowerpiercer - Diglossa sittoides
Rusty Flowerpiercer
Diglossa sittoides hyperythra
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Magdalena department, Colombia.
Female. (S6)


Masked Flowerpiercer - Diglossa cyanea
Masked Flowerpiercer
Diglossa cyanea cyanea
Yanacocha reserve, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
One of the most common and widespread flowerpiercers, occuring in a wide elevational zone in the Andes from Venezuela to Bolivia. (S8)


Bluish Flowerpiercer - Diglossa caerulescens
Bluish Flowerpiercer
Diglossa caerulescens media
Guacamayos Ridge, Napo province, Ecuador.
Distinguished from the above species by the smaller mask and paler underparts. (S8)



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