STORKS   -   CICONIIDAE


Maguari Stork - Ciconia maguari
Maguari Stork
Ciconia maguari
Quinta, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.
There are two separate populations of this species north and south of the Amazon. It seems especially common in far southern Brazil. (D4)


Maguari Stork - Ciconia maguari
Maguari Stork
Ciconia maguari
Campo de Joftre, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S6)


Maguari Stork - Ciconia maguari
Maguari Stork
Ciconia maguari
Campo de Joftre, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S8)


Jabiru - Jabiru mycteria
Jabiru
Jabiru mycteria
Fazenda Santa Tereza (Pantanal Wildlife Center), Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
One of the largest birds in the New World, weighing in around 6 kg, with about a 2.5 m wingspan. While they are rather wide-ranging, from Mexico to northern Argentina, they are only common in extensive wetland areas like the Llanos or the Pantanal. They build huge stick nests in large, often dead trees. Both parents assist in all phases of nesting. (S6)


Jabiru - Jabiru mycteria
Jabiru
Jabiru mycteria
Fazenda Santa Tereza (Pantanal Wildlife Center), Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
This is one of the parents of the clutch in the previous photo, foraging in a nearby pool. (S6)


Jabiru - Jabiru mycteria
Jabiru
Jabiru mycteria
Transpantanal Highway, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Despite their large size, Jabirus are strong flyers. (S6)


Wood Stork - Mycteria americana
Wood Stork
Mycteria americana
Tárcoles, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
Not an attractive bird! I can easily understand the close affinity of storks to the New World vultures. (S5)


Wood Stork - Mycteria americana
Wood Stork
Mycteria americana
Transpantanal Highway, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S8)



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