MANAKINS   -   PIPRIDAE


Pale-bellied Tyrant-Manakin - Neopelma pallescens
Pale-bellied Tyrant-Manakin
Neopelma pallescens
São José da Serra, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
A dull manakin of dry woodland in eastern South America. The buffy eyering is a more obvious feature than most field guides make out. (S5f)


Serra do Mar Tyrant-Manakin - Neopelma chrysolophum
Serra do Mar Tyrant-Manakin
Neopelma chrysolophum
Intervales State Park, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Endemic to the mountains of Southeast Brazil. It has a yellow crown patch which is usually concealed. (S6)


Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin - Tyranneutes stolzmanni
Dwarf Tyrant-Manakin
Tyranneutes stolzmanni
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
One of the most commonly heard birds in the Amazon. Males chirp persistently from song perches around 4 to 6 m off the ground, often through the heat of the day. When not singing, they spend a lot of time feeding in the canopy, so tracking down a singing bird is usually the easiest way to see one. (S6)


Pin-tailed Manakin - Ilicura militaris
Pin-tailed Manakin
Ilicura militaris
Reserva Ecologica de Guapi Assu, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. One of the most handome birds of the Atlantic Forest region! It is endemic to SE Brazil, though it is quite common. (S5f)


Pin-tailed Manakin - Ilicura militaris
Pin-tailed Manakin
Ilicura militaris
Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Female. (S7)


Golden-winged Manakin - Masius chrysopterus
Golden-winged Manakin
Masius chrysopterus coronulatus
End of the Milpe road, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. The golden wings are usually almost completely hidden when the bird is at rest. In this shot a tiny bit shows through on his right wing. When he takes flights, as in the photo below, the the bright flash of color can be quite a shock. (S5f)


Golden-winged Manakin - Masius chrysopterus
Golden-winged Manakin
Masius chrysopterus coronulatus
End of the Milpe road, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. Even though it's a pretty blurry shot, it catches the bird in a unique way; the photo was published in the May 2013 issue of Discover Magazine. (S5f)


Golden-winged Manakin - Masius chrysopterus
Golden-winged Manakin
Masius chrysopterus coronulatus
Mashpi, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


White-ruffed Manakin - Corapipo altera
White-ruffed Manakin
Corapipo altera heteroleuca
Nusagandi, Comarca de Guna Yaka, Panama.
Immature male, just starting to show some black on the face. He came back to that root several times, so I think it will be his future display area. (S8)


White-ruffed Manakin - Corapipo altera
White-ruffed Manakin
Corapipo altera heteroleuca
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
Female. Not much to distinguish her, but the black bill & legs and the yellow belly separates from other similar species occurring there. (S8)


White-bibbed Manakin - Corapipo leucorrhoa
White-bibbed Manakin
Corapipo leucorrhoa
Bellavista Reserve, Victoria, Caldas, Colombia.
Male. Very similar to the previous species, and formerly considered conspecific. (S11)


Club-winged Manakin - Machaeropterus deliciosus
Club-winged Manakin
Machaeropterus deliciosus
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male, caught in the middle of his unique display. This is one of the coolest birds in the world. No other bird is known to create pure tones with its feathers. Click here for an excellent New York Times article about how they do it. This photo was published in the May 2013 issue of Discover Magazine. (S5f)


Club-winged Manakin - Machaeropterus deliciosus
Club-winged Manakin
Machaeropterus deliciosus
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. The same guy taking a breather. (S5f)


Western Striped Manakin - Machaeropterus striolatus
(Western) Striped Manakin
Machaeropterus regulus antioquiae
Reserva El Paujil, Santander department, Colombia.
Male. SACC hasn't split Striped Manakin yet, but the evidence is pretty strong. Compare with the next photo. (D3)


Eastern Striped Manakin - Machaeropterus regulus
(Eastern) Striped Manakin
Machaeropterus regulus regulus
Reserve Ecologica de Guapi Assu, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. (D3)


Fiery-capped Manakin - Machaeropterus pyrocephalus
Fiery-capped Manakin
Machaeropterus pyrocephalus pyrocephalus
Pousada Jardim da Amazonia, São José do Rio Claro, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
Female. Not the best shot, but I include it since photos of the female of this species are very scarce. (S7)


Blue-rumped Manakin - Lepidothrix isidorei
Blue-rumped Manakin
Lepidothrix isidorei isidorei
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador
Male. The blue rump is barely visible in this shot. Other than that feature, males look virtually identical to White-crowned Manakin Dixiphia pipra. This species occurs in foothill forest along the east slope of the Andes from Colombia to N Peru. (S7)


Snow-capped Manakin - Lepidothrix nattereri
Snow-capped Manakin
Lepidothrix nattereri gracilis
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. Endemic to the south-central part of the Amazon; almost restricted to Brazil, but does just barely reach Bolivia. (S7)


Blue-crowned Manakin - Lepidothrix coronata
Blue-crowned Manakin
Lepidothrix coronata velutina
Carara NP, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
Male. (D3)


Golden-collared Manakin - Manacus vitellinus
Golden-collared Manakin
Manacus vitellinus vitellinus
Tortí, Panama province, Colombia.
Male. (S8)


Golden-collared Manakin - Manacus vitellinus
Golden-collared Manakin
Manacus vitellinus viridiventris
Trail between El Valle and Utría National Park, Chocó department, Colombia.
Male. (S8)


White-collared Manakin - Manacus candei
White-collared Manakin
Manacus candei
La Selva OTS, Heredia province, Costa Rica.
Male, caught in the midst of his wing-snapping display. (S8)


White-bearded Manakin - Manacus manacus
White-bearded Manakin
Manacus manacus gutturosus
Male. A common and widespread manakin in South America, found in most wet tropical forests. (S6)

White-bearded Manakin - Manacus manacus
White-bearded Manakin
Manacus manacus gutturosus
RPPN Frei Caneca, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
Female. (S6)


Araripe Manakin - Antilophia bokermanni
Araripe Manakin
Antilophia bokermanni
Arajara Park, Ceará state, Brazil.
Male. One of the most amazing discoveries of recent years. Words cannot describe how cool this bird is - if you ever get a chance to see it, go for it! (S6)


Araripe Manakin - Antilophia bokermanni
Araripe Manakin
Antilophia bokermanni
Arajara Park, Ceará state, Brazil.
Male. (D3)


Helmeted Manakin - Antilophia galeata
Helmeted Manakin
Antilophia galeata
Serra do Cipó NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Male. Obviously a close relative of the previous, and still a pretty neat bird. Unlike the other, this is a very widespread species in drier tropical areas of South America. (S5f)


Helmeted Manakin - Antilophia galeata
Helmeted Manakin
Antilophia galeata
São José da Serra, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Female. (S5f)


Lance-tailed Manakin - Chiroxiphia lanceolata
Lance-tailed Manakin
Chiroxiphia lanceolata
Tayrona National Park, Magdalena, Colombia.
Male. All members of this genus have very similar plumage, but the elaborate breeding displays by teams of males are one of the most fascinating spectacles a neotropical birder can hope to see. (S11)


Swallow-tailed Manakin - Chiroxiphia caudata
Swallow-tailed Manakin
Chiroxiphia caudata
Balbina Forest, Bandeira, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Male. The close affinity with the above species is pretty obvious in these photos. (D3)


Blue-backed Manakin - Chiroxiphia pareola
Blue-backed Manakin
Chiroxiphia pareola pareola
Santa Luzia de Itanhy, Sergipe state, Brazil.
Immature male. (S6)


Green Manakin - Cryptopipo holochlora
Green Manakin
Cryptopipo holochlora litae
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
One of the dullest of all the manakins. Males and females have identical plumage. This subspecies is endemic to the Chocó region, and is occasionally split off as "Lita Manakin".


Black Manakin - Xenopipo atronitens
Black Manakin
Xenopipo atronitens
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. Very localized in the Amazon and Guianan regions, occuring only in forest on sandy soil. (S6)


Black Manakin - Xenopipo atronitens
Black Manakin
Xenopipo atronitens
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Female. (S6)


Orange-crowned Manakin - Heterocercus aurantiivertex
Orange-crowned Manakin
Heterocercus aurantiivertex
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador
Male. Locally fairly common in lowland várzea forest in eastern Ecuador, northern Peru, and far western Brazil. It seems likely to occur in Colombia, but has not yet been recorded. (S8)


Orange-crowned Manakin - Heterocercus aurantiivertex
Orange-crowned Manakin
Heterocercus aurantiivertex
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador
Female. (S8)


Yellow-crowned Manakin - Heterocercus flavivertex
Yellow-crowned Manakin
Heterocercus flavivertex
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. Sometimes called Yellow-crested Manakin. It is found in the northern parts of the Amazon basin. It is often found in sandy soil areas, but does not seem to be restricted to them. It is very similar to the next species, but they occur in different habitats, which helps to justify maintaining them as separate species. (S6)


Flame-crowned Manakin - Heterocercus linteatus
Flame-crowned Manakin
Heterocercus linteatus
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. Sometimes called Flame-crested Manakin. Found in várzea forest south of the Amazon, mainly in Brazil. (D6)


Crimson-hooded Manakin - Pipra aureola
Crimson-hooded Manakin
Pipra aureola aureola
Caño Colorado, Monagas state, Venezuela.
Male. What a beautiful bird. He sat in the open for not much more than five seconds, but it was enough. (D3)


Wire-tailed Manakin - Pipra filicauda
Wire-tailed Manakin
Pipra filicauda filicauda
Sacha Lodge, Orellana province, Ecuador.
(D3)


Band-tailed Manakin - Pipra fasciicauda
Band-tailed Manakin
Pipra fasciicauda scarlatina
Iguazú National Park, Misiones province, Argentina.
Male. (S6)


Band-tailed Manakin - Pipra fasciicauda
Band-tailed Manakin
Pipra fasciicauda scarlatina
Serra de Baturité, Ceará state, Brazil.
Female. An isolated population, but thought to be the same subspecies as the male in the previous photo. (D3)


White-crowned Manakin - Dixiphia pipra
White-crowned Manakin
Dixiphia pipra coracina
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador
Male. Occurs widely in Neotropical rainforests, but huge vocal differences within this species suggest that several species may be involved. (S7)


Scarlet-horned Manakin - Ceratopipra cornuta
Scarlet-horned Manakin
Ceratopipra cornuta
Sierra de Lema (La Escalera), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Male. A tepui endemic. (D3)


Red-capped Manakin - Ceratopipra mentalis
Red-capped Manakin
Ceratopipra mentalis mentalis
Las Guacamayas, Chiapas state, Mexico.
Male. (S5)


Red-capped Manakin - Ceratopipra mentalis
Red-capped Manakin
Ceratopipra mentalis ignifera
Soberania NP, Panama.
Male. (S2f)


Red-capped Manakin - Ceratopipra mentalis
Red-capped Manakin
Ceratopipra mentalis ignifera
Panama Rainforest Discover Center, Colón province, Panama.
Female. (S8)


Golden-headed Manakin - Ceratopipra erythrocephala
Golden-headed Manakin
Ceratopipra erythrocephala berlepschi
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Red-headed Manakin - Ceratopipra rubrocapilla
Red-headed Manakin
Ceratopipra rubrocapilla
Reserva Natural Palmarí, Amazonas state, Brazil.
Two males displaying side by side. (D3)


Red-headed Manakin - Ceratopipra rubrocapilla
Red-headed Manakin
Ceratopipra rubrocapilla
South of Camamu, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. (S6)


Black-capped Piprites - Piprites pileata
Black-capped Piprites
Piprites pileata
Algulhas Negras road, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. A very strange genus that has taxonomists scratching their heads. SACC removed it from the manakins and put it in the category incertae sedis (uncertain placement), though I'm keeping it in it's "traditional" place. This shot shows the white speculum clearly, indicating that it's a male. The female lacks this feature, but has faint wingbars. (D2)


Wing-barred Piprites - Piprites chloris
Wing-barred Piprites
Piprites chloris chloris
Reserva Volta Velha, Itapoá, Santa Catarina state, Brazil.
Much more widespread than the other Piprites, this species occurs from Northern Colombia through the Amazon basin, and in the southern part of the Atlantic Forest. (D4)

















Website design and all photos copyright Nick Athanas
For questions, comments, or photograph licensing info, please email