IBISES AND SPOONBILLS   -   THRESKIORNITHIDAE


White Ibis - Eudocimus albus
White Ibis
Eudocimus albus
Tárcoles, Puntarenas Province, Costa Rica.
(S6)


Glossy Ibis - Plegadis falcinellus
Glossy Ibis
Plegadis falcinellus
La Segua Marsh, Manabí province, Ecuador.
This species seems to be spreading into western Ecuador; Ridgely & Greenfield (2001) called it a "casual visitant", though in recent years it has become fairly common in areas with extensive wetlands. (S8)


White-faced Ibis - Plegadis chihi
White-faced Ibis
Plegadis chihi
Trelew, Chubut province, Argentina.
In breeding plumage. It's a monotypic species despite having a very disjunct range, in North American and in South America south of the Amazon basin. (S6)


White-faced Ibis - Plegadis chihi
White-faced Ibis
Plegadis chihi
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
This species is inexplicably scarce in the northern Pantanal - this was the only time I had ever seen one there after five visits. This one is not in breeding plumage, so it lacks the white lines on the face. (S5)


Puna Ibis - Plegadis ridgwayi
Puna Ibis
Plegadis ridgwayi
Lauca National Park, Region I, Chile.
(S5)


Green Ibis - Mesembrinibis cayennensis
Green Ibis
Mesembrinibis cayennensis
Caño Negro, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
In savanna areas such as Caño Negro, where this photo was taken, and the Pantanal, Green Ibises can be very approachable. However, it also occurs throughout the Amazonian region (below), where its habits are decidedly different, being very shy and hard to observe, usually seen at dawn or dusk. (S8)


Green Ibis - Mesembrinibis cayennensis
Green Ibis
Mesembrinibis cayennensis
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
(S8)


Bare-faced Ibis - Phimosus infuscatus
Bare-faced Ibis
Phimosus infuscatus infuscatus
Taim Biological Reserve, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.
(D4)


Bare-faced Ibis - Phimosus infuscatus
Bare-faced Ibis
Phimosus infuscatus ssp?
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S5)


Bare-faced Ibis - Phimosus infuscatus
Bare-faced Ibis
Phimosus infuscatus berlepschi
Tilapia farms north of Lago Agrio, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Up until 2013, this species was extremely rare in eastern Ecuador. Now they seem to be everywhere! The reason for the sudden population explosion, and whether they will remain is still unknown. (S8)


Plumbeous Ibis - Theristicus caerulescens
Plumbeous Ibis
Theristicus caerulescens
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
A cool looking ibis of wetlands in southeastern South America. The white stripe on the forehead combined with the red eye and shaggy mane give it a very distinct appearance. (S5)


Plumbeous Ibis - Theristicus caerulescens
Plumbeous Ibis
Theristicus caerulescens
Transpantanal Highway, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(D2)


Buff-necked Ibis - Theristicus caudatus
Buff-necked Ibis
Theristicus caudatus hyperorius
Fazenda Santa Teresa, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S7)


Black-faced Ibis - Theristicus melanopis
Black-faced Ibis
Theristicus melanopis melanopis
Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
Resting its left leg. This is the nominate ssp., which is found from Peru to Tierra del Fuego. Note the large wattle. (S8)


Black-faced Ibis - Theristicus melanopis
Black-faced Ibis
Theristicus melanopis melanopis
Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
This is the same bird as in the above photo. (S8)


Black-faced Ibis - Theristicus melanopis
Black-faced (Andean) Ibis
Theristicus melanopis branickii
Antisana reserve, Napo province, Ecuador.
This subspecies is split by some authorities. It inhabits very high elevations in the Andes, and lacks the black wattle of the nominate race (above). It seems inconsistent to split Buff-necked Ibis, yet not split Andean Ibis. (D3)


Roseate Spoonbill - Platalea ajaja
Roseate Spoonbill
Platalea ajaja
Tárcoles, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
(S8)


Roseate Spoonbill - Platalea ajaja
Roseate Spoonbill
Platalea ajaja
Tárcoles, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
(S5)



Next page
Previous page
Back to gallery index












Website design and all photos copyright Nick Athanas
For questions, comments, or photograph licensing info, please email