HUMMINGBIRDS   -   TROCHILIDAE   -   PART V

Booted Racket-tail, White-tailed Hillstar, whitetips, brilliants, starthroats, others


Booted Racket-tail - Ocreatus underwoodii
Booted Racket-tail
Ocreatus underwoodii melanantherus
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. The northern races have white leg puffs. (S5)


Booted Racket-tail - Ocreatus underwoodii
Booted Racket-tail
Ocreatus underwoodii melanantherus
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Booted Racket-tail - Ocreatus underwoodii
Booted Racket-tail
Ocreatus underwoodii peruanus
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. From the eastern Andes of Ecuador south through Bolivia, males have buff leg puffs. Females also differ somewhat (see below), and these races may eventually be regarded as  a separate species. (S7)


Booted Racket-tail - Ocreatus underwoodii
Booted Racket-tail
Ocreatus underwoodii peruanus
Abra Patricia, San Martín department, Peru.
Female. (S6)


White-tailed Hillstar - Urochroa bougueri
White-tailed Hillstar
Urochroa bougueri leucura
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. This is the east Andean race, found on the east slope from Colombia to N Peru; compare it with the nominate west Andean race below. (S7)


White-tailed Hillstar - Urochroa bougueri
White-tailed Hillstar
Urochroa bougueri bougueri
Las Tangaras Reserve, El Carmen, Chocó department, Colombia.
Male. The nominate race is endemic to the Chocó region and has a more prominent rufous malar, black outer tail feathers that make the tail appear mostly dark while perched, and has more bronzy upperparts. It has been suggested that the two races might be better treated as distinct species. (S6)


Purple-bibbed Whitetip - Urosticte benjamini
Purple-bibbed Whitetip
Urosticte benjamini
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Purple-bibbed Whitetip - Urosticte benjamini
Purple-bibbed Whitetip
Urosticte benjamini
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Male. (S8f)


Purple-bibbed Whitetip - Urosticte benjamini
Purple-bibbed Whitetip
Urosticte benjamini
Las Tangaras Reserve, El Carmen, Chocó department, Colombia.
Female. (S6)


Rufous-vented Whitetip - Urosticte ruficrissa
Rufous-vented Whitetip
Urosticte ruficrissa
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. A scarce hummer found on the east slope of the Andes from southern Colombia to northern Peru. (S7)


Velvet-browed Brilliant - Heliodoxa xanthogonys
Velvet-browed Brilliant
Heliodoxa xanthogonys
Sierra de Lema (La Escalera), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Male. Endemic to the tepui region. (D3)


Black-throated Brilliant - Heliodoxa schreibersii
Black-throated Brilliant
Heliodoxa schreibersii schreibersii
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador
Male. Occurs in the western part of the Amazon basin and the adjacent lower east slopes of the Andes. A photo of the female is below. (S7)


Black-throated Brilliant - Heliodoxa schreibersii
Black-throated Brilliant
Heliodoxa schreibersii schreibersii
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador
Female. (S7)


Gould's Jewelfront - Heliodoxa aurescens
Gould's Jewelfront
Heliodoxa aurescens
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. A truly spectacular and unique hummer found throughout much of the Amazon basin and adjacent lower Andean slopes. Definitely one of the most striking Amazonian hummingbirds; I think they are equalled only by the topazes. There was very little light when I took this photo, so I was shooting at f/2.8, with a very narrow depth of field - that's why the bill and lower underparts are out of focus. (S7)


Fawn-breasted Brilliant - Heliodoxa rubinoides
Fawn-breasted Brilliant
Heliodoxa rubinoides aequatorialis
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Fawn-breasted Brilliant - Heliodoxa rubinoides
Fawn-breasted Brilliant
Heliodoxa rubinoides aequatorialis
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Male. (S8f)


Fawn-breasted Brilliant - Heliodoxa rubinoides
Fawn-breasted Brilliant
Heliodoxa rubinoides aequatorialis
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.
Female, without the glittering throat patch. (S8)


Green-crowned Brilliant - Heliodoxa jacula
Green-crowned Brilliant
Heliodoxa jacula jamesoni
Mirador Rio Blanco, Los Bancos, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Male. (S6)


Green-crowned Brilliant - Heliodoxa jacula
Green-crowned Brilliant
Heliodoxa jacula jamesoni
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Females. (S8)


Empress Brilliant - Heliodoxa imperatrix
Empress Brilliant
Heliodoxa imperatrix
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.
Adult male. A big and beautiful Chocó endemic. I photographed this one at nearly dusk, where the soft ambient late really made the subtle iridescence of the belly and forecrown stand out. (D3)


Empress Brilliant - Heliodoxa imperatrix
Empress Brilliant
Heliodoxa imperatrix
Amaguza reserve, Mashpi, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Immature male. (S8)


Empress Brilliant - Heliodoxa imperatrix
Empress Brilliant
Heliodoxa imperatrix
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha Province, Ecuador.
Adult female. (S8)


Empress Brilliant - Heliodoxa imperatrix
Empress Brilliant
Heliodoxa imperatrix
Amaguza reserve, Mashpi, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Immature female. (S8)


Violet-fronted Brilliant - Heliodoxa leadbeateri
Violet-fronted Brilliant
Heliodoxa leadbeateri otero
Manu road below San Pedro, Madre de Dios department, Peru.
Male. The sister species of Green-crowned Brilliant above, replacing it east of the Andes. A photo of the female is below. (S6)


Violet-fronted Brilliant - Heliodoxa leadbeateri
Violet-fronted Brilliant
Heliodoxa leadbeateri sagitta
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female. A photo of the male is above. (S7)


Brazilian Ruby - Clytolaema rubricauda
Brazilian Ruby
Clytolaema rubricauda
Vale das Taquaras Lodge, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. A monotypic genus, but thought to be related to the Heliodoxa brilliants (below). (S7)


Brazilian Ruby - Clytolaema rubricauda
Brazilian Ruby
Clytolaema rubricauda
Hotel do Ypê, Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Female. (S5)


Giant Hummingbird - Patagona gigas
Giant Hummingbird
Patagona gigas peruviana
Tipón ruins, Cusco region, Peru.
Female or immature. The world's largest hummer, up to 22 cm (8 ¾ in) in length. It's found at high elevations throughout much of the Andes, though avoids very wet regions. (S8)


Magnificent Hummingbird - Eugenes fulgens
Magnificent Hummingbird
Eugenes fulgens spectabilis
Bosque de Paz, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
Male. Compared the the more northerly nominate subspecies, this one has more blue in the gorget and paler underparts. (S5)


Magnificent Hummingbird - Eugenes fulgens
Magnificent Hummingbird
Eugenes fulgens spectabilis
Bosque de Paz, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
Male. This bird was coming the the feeders at the same time as the hummer above. I suspect it is a partial albino. (S5)


Long-billed Starthroat - Heliomaster longirostris
Long-billed Starthroat
Heliomaster longirostris albicrissa
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador.
Female, because of the lack of blue on the crown. (S5)


Long-billed Starthroat - Heliomaster longirostris
Long-billed Starthroat
Heliomaster longirostris longirostris
Hotel Minca, Minca, Magdalena, Colombia.
Female. (S11)


Stripe-breasted Starthroat - Heliomaster squamosus
Stripe-breasted Starthroat
Heliomaster squamosus
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Male. Endemic to Brazil, though it does have a fairly large range. (D2)


Stripe-breasted Starthroat - Heliomaster squamosus
Stripe-breasted Starthroat
Heliomaster squamosus
Canudos, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. (S6)


Blue-tufted Starthroat - Heliomaster furcifer
Blue-tufted Starthroat
Heliomaster furcifer
Oxbow lake next to the Rio Claro, São José do Rio Claro, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. Males of this species can be stunning in the right light, unfortunately there was very strong sunlight here, making photography difficult. It's found in dry forest and woodland in interior Brazil south through Bolivia and northern Argentina. (S7)


Fiery-throated Hummingbird - Panterpe insignis
Fiery-throated Hummingbird
Panterpe insignis insignis
Hotel Georgina, Villa Mills, San José province, Costa Rica.
The brilliant feathers on the throat are visible only from a very tiny angle. This individual did not show much of that even at the right angle, making me think it was a female or juvenile. This species is almost endemic to Costa Rica, but makes it into extreme western Panama. (S6)



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