HUMMINGBIRDS   -   TROCHILIDAE   -   PART III

Piedtails, Speckled Hummingbird, Blossomcrown, sylphs, comets, Oreotrochilus hillstars, thornbills, metaltails


Ecuadorian Piedtail - Phlogophilus hemileucurus
Ecuadorian Piedtail
Phlogophilus hemileucurus
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Found in Andean east slope foothills of Ecuador as well as southern Colombia and northern Peru. (S7)


Speckled Hummingbird - Adelomyia melanogenys
Speckled Hummingbird
Adelomyia melanogenys chlorospila
Aguas Calientes, Cusco department, Peru.
A common and widespread hummer found in middle elevations of the tropical Andes as well as the coastal range of Venezuela. (S6)


Speckled Hummingbird - Adelomyia melanogenys
Speckled Hummingbird
Adelomyia melanogenys melanogenys
Abra Patricia, San Martín department, Peru.
(S6)


Speckled Hummingbird - Adelomyia melanogenys
Speckled Hummingbird
Adelomyia melanogenys maculata
Utuana reserve, Loja province, Ecuador.
The race found west of the Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru. It is slightly duller than the nominate. (S5)


Blossomcrown - Anthocephala floriceps
Blossomcrown
Anthocephala floriceps floriceps
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Colombia.
Male. This little hummer is endemic to Colombia, yet has a rather disjunct range. This one is from the Santa Marta mountains, but there is another subspecies (berlepschi) endemic to the southern part of the central Andes. (S6)


Long-tailed Sylph - Aglaiocercus kingii
Long-tailed Sylph
Aglaiocercus kingii smaragdinus
Abra Patricia, San Martín deparment, Peru.
Male. The common and widespread sylph of the subtropical Andes. It is replaced by the next species on the west of the Andes in Colombia and Ecuador. (S6)


Violet-tailed Sylph - Aglaiocercus coelestis
Violet-tailed Sylph
Aglaiocercus coelestis coelestis
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. It is much more common than Long-tailed Sylph (A. kingi) in the Chocó region. A common visitor to feeders in the Tandayapa-Mindo area of Ecuador. (S8)


Violet-tailed Sylph - Aglaiocercus coelestis
Violet-tailed Sylph
Aglaiocercus coelestis coelestis
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. Females are much less common at the Tandayapa feeders than males. (S4)


Venezuelan Sylph - Aglaiocercus berlepschi
Venezuelan Sylph
Aglaiocercus berlepschi
Cerro Negro, Monagas state, Venezuela.
Female. This species is endemic to the isolated northeastern mountain ranges of Venezuela. While the male is very similar to the widespread Long-tailed Sylph (A. kingi), the female is unique in the genus in having all white underparts. (D3)


Red-tailed Comet - Sappho sparganurus
Red-tailed Comet
Sappho sparganurus sapho
Parque provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
Male. Found in the Andes from Bolivia to Argentina. (S8)


Red-tailed Comet - Sappho sparganurus
Red-tailed Comet
Sappho sparganurus sapho
Parque provincial Potrero de Yala, Jujuy province, Argentina.
(S8)


Red-tailed Comet - Sappho sparganurus
Red-tailed Comet
Sappho sparganurus sapho
Cuesta del Obispo, Salta province, Argentina.
(S5)


Gray-bellied Comet - Taphrolesbia griseiventris
Gray-bellied Comet
Taphrolesbia griseiventris
Rio Chonta, Cajamarca department, Peru.
Male. A rare and endangered north Peruvian endemic. There were no reliable sites for it until it was found in the Rio Chonta near Cajamarca in 1999. (D2)


Ecuadorian Hillstar - Oreotrochilus chimborazo
Ecuadorian Hillstar
Oreotrochilus chimborazo jamesonii
Reserva Ecologica Antisana, Napo prov., Ecuador.

Male. One of the highest ranging hummers in the world, regularly getting up to 4600 m (15000 ft), and sometimes even higher. (S3)


Ecuadorian Hillstar - Oreotrochilus chimborazo
Ecuadorian Hillstar
Oreotrochilus chimborazo jamesonii
Reserva Ecologica Antisana, Napo prov., Ecuador.
Female. (S3)


Andean Hillstar - Oreotrochilus estella
Andean/White-sided Hillstar
Oreotrochilus estella/leucopleurus
El Infiernillo, Tucumán province, Argentina.
Females of these species are very hard to tell apart. Birds of Chile and HBW give conflicting information about the tail pattern, so for now I will leave it unidentified. I'd love to hear any opinions about this bird. Click here for a blurry shot of the tail from above (same individual). (S8)


Wedge-tailed Hillstar - Oreotrochilus adela
Wedge-tailed Hillstar
Oreotrochilus adela
Yavi, Jujuy province, Argentina.
Male. What a great bird! One of my favorites from the Argentina tours I guided in late 2009. This species ranges mainly in Bolivia, and only barely gets into Argentina. (S5)


Black-tailed Trainbearer - Lesbia victoriae
Black-tailed Trainbearer
Lesbia victoriae victoriae
Observatorio de Colibríes, La Calera, Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Male. The two trainbearer species inhabitat high elevation Andean forest and scrub. Black-tailed tends to prefer drier areas. While birds like this with full-length tails are easy to identify, females and males with shorter tails can be harder. At least in the northern part of its range, the thicker, more decurved bill is a helpful ID feature for Black-tailed. (S11)


Green-tailed Trainbearer - Lesbia nuna
Green-tailed Trainbearer
Lesbia nuna gracilis
Observatorio de Colibríes, La Calera, Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Female. Green-tailed prefers more humid areas than Black-tailed, but they can occur together locally. The shorter, thinner, and almost straight bill helps distinguish it from female Black-tailed. (S11)


Black-backed Thornbill - Ramphomicron dorsale
Black-backed Thornbill
Ramphomicron dorsale
El Dorado Lodge, Santa Marta Mountains, Magdalena department, Colombia.
Male. One of the most rarely encountered of the Santa Marta endemics. It took me seven visits covering over three weeks to finally see one. This subadult male was frequently visiting the feeders at the lodge in late January and early February 2011. I suspect it is a lot more common in other, less accessible parts of the mountain range. (S6)


Purple-backed Thornbill - Ramphomicron microrhynchum
Purple-backed Thornbill
Ramphomicron microrhynchum microrhynchum
Yanacocha reserve, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. A gorgeous high Andean hummer found in elfin forest from Venezuela to Bolivia. They seem to move around quite a lot. One week they might be common at a particular site, then seemingly completely absent the next week. (S8)


Purple-backed Thornbill - Ramphomicron microrhynchum
Purple-backed Thornbill
Ramphomicron microrhynchum albiventre
Bosque Unchog, Huánuco department, Peru.
Female. (S8)


Blue-mantled Thornbill - Chalcostigma stanleyi
Blue-mantled Thornbill
Chalcostigma stanleyi stanleyi
Abra Malaga, Cusco department, Peru.
Male. A hummer of high elevation Andean scrub and páramo from Ecuador to Bolivia. (S7)


Blue-mantled Thornbill - Chalcostigma stanleyi
Blue-mantled Thornbill
Chalcostigma stanleyi stanleyi
Papallacta Pass, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female. Some females show a lot of green on the throat, but this one shows almost none. (S5)


Bronze-tailed Thornbill - Chalcostigma heteropogon
Bronze-tailed Thornbill
Chalcostigma heteropogon
Páramo del Tamá, Táchira state, Venezuela.
Male. This species just barely makes it over the Colombian border into Venezuela. The photo was taken less than a kilometer from the border. It's a poor shot but I include it since it is one of few documented records from Venezuela. (D3)


Rainbow-bearded Thornbill - Chalcostigma herrani
Rainbow-bearded Thornbill
Chalcostigma herrani herrani
A few kms west of Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. Fantastic, it's hard to get that crown and beard color with natural light. This is a beautiful high Andean hummer from central Colombia south through northern Peru. (S6)


Rainbow-bearded Thornbill - Chalcostigma herrani
Rainbow-bearded Thornbill
Chalcostigma herrani herrani
A few kms west of Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male, a different individual. (S5)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina quitensis
Yanacocha, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. A widespread and often common hummer of high mountains from northern Colombia to northern Bolivia. There are at least seven subspecies that differ mostly in tail color; this subspecies has a bronzy tail, visible in the shot of the female below. (S8)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina quitensis
Yanacocha, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S4)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina districta
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Colombia.
Male. This is the subspecies endemic to the Santa Marta range, and it may better be treated as a separate species. Tail color is purple instead of copper, and the female (below) lacks spotting on the throat and breast. (S5)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina districta
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta mountains, Colombia.
Female. (S5)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina smaragdinicollis
Puente Carrizal, Satipo Road, Junín region, Peru.
Male. This is the southernmost subspecies found in eastern Peru and northern Bolivia. (S8)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina smaragdinicollis
Puente Carrizal, Satipo Road, Junín region, Peru.
Female. (S8)


Tyrian Metaltail - Metallura tyrianthina
Tyrian Metaltail
Metallura tyrianthina tyrianthina
Observatorio de Colibríes, La Calera, Cundinamarca, Colombia.
Male. (S11)


Viridian Metaltail - Metallura williami
Viridian Metaltail
Metallura williami primolina
Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. Some of the races are quite different from each other, and could eventually be split. Primolina is found in Colombia and Ecuador, and males have a green undertail and darker green throat. (S8)


Viridian Metaltail - Metallura williami
Viridian Metaltail
Metallura williami primolina
Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female, with rusty speckling on the underparts. (S5f)


Violet-throated Metaltail - Metallura baroni
Violet-throated Metaltail
Metallura baroni
El Cajas National Park, Azuay province, Ecuador.
Male. One of only a few species endemic to mainland Ecuador. It has a tiny range in montane scrub in south-central Ecuador, west and south of the city of Cuenca. (S8)


Violet-throated Metaltail - Metallura baroni
Violet-throated Metaltail
Metallura baroni
El Cajas National Park, Azuay province, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Neblina Metaltail - Metallura odomae
Neblina Metaltail
Metallura odomae
Cordillera de Lagunillas, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
Female. This hummer has a very small world range in the mountains of far southern Ecuador and extreme northern Peru. It was only described in 1980. (S6)


Coppery Metaltail - Metallura theresiae
Coppery Metaltail
Metallura theresiae theresiae
Abra Barro Negro, Amazonas department, Peru.
Female. Endemic to the high Andes of northern Peru. The male is similar but brighter. (S6)


Black Metaltail - Metallura phoebe
Black Metaltail
Metallura phoebe
Cumbremayo, Cajamarca department, Peru.
Male. Endemic to the high Andes of Peru, though it may well be found in Chile eventually. (S6)



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