OVENBIRDS   -   FURNARIIDAE   -   PART I

Leaftossers, miners, xenops, White-throated Treerunner, Ochetorhynchus & Tarphonomus earthcreepers, horneros.

Note: Woodcreepers have now been merged with the Furnariidae, but I prefer to keep them in a separate gallery.

Tawny-throated Leaftosser - Sclerurus mexicanus
Tawny-throated Leaftosser
Sclerurus mexicanus bahiae
Folha Seca, Ubatuba, São Paulo state, Brazil.
The most widespread leaftosser, but it's not really common anywhere. It has a more curved bill than other leaftossers. (S6)


Scaly-throated Leaftosser - Sclerurus guatemalensis
Scaly-throated Leaftosser
Sclerurus guatemalensis salvini
Rio Silanche Bird Santuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A leaftosser of lowland rainforest, found from southern Mexico to western Ecuador. (S8)


Gray-throated Leaftosser - Sclerurus albigularis
Gray-throated Leaftosser
Sclerurus albigularis zamorae
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
One of my better leaftosser shots - the f/2.8 lens helped a lot. This species lives in foothill rainforest in parts of Central America and the northern half of South America. (S7)


Rufous-breasted Leaftosser - Sclerurus scansor
Rufous-breasted Leaftosser
Sclerurus scansor cearensis
Pico Alto, Serra de Baturité, Ceará state, Brazil.
Leaftossers are usually a huge pain to photograph, as they inhabit the deepest, darkest forests and like to stay hidden. There are occasional exceptions; I took some liberties with the taxonomic order to make sure this photo came first. This particular leaftosser, didn't seem to mind sitting totally out in the open and posing for a photo. This is a distinctive subspecies, likely to be elevated to full species status some day. It lacks the throat streaking of the nominate race, is brighter rufous overall, and has a somewhat different song. (D3)


Common Miner - Geositta cunicularia
Common Miner
Geositta cunicularia cunicularia
Valdés Peninsula, Chubut province, Argentina.
There is a lot of racial variation in this species, and it seems likely more than one species is involved. This is the nominat race, occuring in the lowlands of SE South America. It is more heavily marked below than any other race. (S6)


Slender-billed Miner - Geositta tenuirostris
Slender-billed Miner
Geositta tenuirostris tenuirostris
Cajamarca-Celendín Road, Cajamarca department, Peru.
The long, thin, decurved bill sets this bird apart from all other miners. It occurs in grassy areas of the high Andes from Ecuador to northern Argentina and northern Chile. (S6)


Short-billed Miner - Geositta antarctica
Short-billed Miner
Geositta antarctica
Northern Tierra del Fuego, Region XII, Chile.
Breeds only in the exteme southern part of South America, dispersing farther north during the winter. (S5)


Dark-winged Miner - Geositta saxicolina
Dark-winged Miner
Geositta saxicolina
Lake Junín, Junín department, Peru.
Endemic to the high Andes of central Peru. (S8)


Puna Miner - Geositta punensis
Puna Miner
Geositta punensis
Laguna de los Pozuelos, Jujuy province, Argentina.
A common bird of the altiplano from southern Peru to northern Chile & Argentina. (S6)


Rufous-banded Miner - Geositta rufipennis
Rufous-banded Miner
Geositta rufipennis rufipennis
La Cuesta del Obispo, Salta province, Argentina.
A locally common bird on dry, rocky slopes. It's found in the Andes of Bolivia, Argentina, and Chile, as well as the Sierra de Córdoba in central Argentina. (S5)


Campo Miner - Geositta poeciloptera Campo Miner - Geositta poeciloptera
Campo Miner
Geositta poeciloptera
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
This species seems to be restricted to recently-burned grasslands. It occurs very locally in SC Brazil and NE Bolivia. (D3)
Campo Miner
Geositta poeciloptera
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Another shot of the same bird. (D3)


Plain Xenops - Xenops minutus
Plain Xenops
Xenops minutus littoralis
Pipeline Road, Soberania National Park, Colón province, Panama.
(S8)


Point-tailed Palmcreeper - Berlepschia rikeri
Point-tailed Palmcreeper
Berlepschia rikeri
Alta Floresta, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
Widespread in tropical South America, but restricted to Moriche Palm groves (Mauritia flexuosa). (S11)


White-throated Treerunner - Pygarrhichas albogularis
White-throated Treerunner
Pygarrhichas albogularis
Martial Glaciar, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.
A unique furnariid restricted to Chile and Argentina. it is very nuthatch-like, both in appearance and behavior. (S8)


Rock Earthcreeper - Ochetorhynchus andaecola
Rock Earthcreeper
Ochetorhynchus andaecola
La Cuesta del Obispo, Salta province, Argentina.
Not a particularly well-named bird - most earthcreepers like to run around on the rocks, and this particular one is clearly perched in a tree! This species occurs in the high Andes of Bolivia to northern Chile and Argentina. (S5)


Straight-billed Earthcreeper - Ochetorhynchus ruficaudus
Straight-billed Earthcreeper
Ochetorhynchus ruficaudus montana
Sierra de Santa Victoria, Salta province, Argentina.
Earthcreepers are very distinctive, terrestrial birds of the southern South America. One species reaches as far north in the Andes as northern Peru. This species inhabits dry, rocky slopes from southern Peru south to central Argentina. (S8)


Band-tailed Earthcreeper - Ochetorhynchus phoenicurus
Band-tailed Earthcreeper
Ochetorhynchus phoenicurus
Trelew-Punta Tombo road, Chubut province, Argentina.
This species is restricted to the steppes of southern Patagonia. (S6)


Band-tailed Earthcreeper - Ochetorhynchus phoenicurus
Band-tailed Earthcreeper
Ochetorhynchus phoenicurus
Valdes Peninsula, Chubut province, Argentina.
(S6)


Crag Chila - Ochetorhynchus melanurus
Crag Chilia
Ochetorhynchus melanurus
El Yeso, Santiago Metropolitan Region, Chile.
This Chilean endemic was formerly places in it's own monotypic genus Chilia, but has since been lumped due to it's clear similarities with the earthcreepers. (S5)


Streaked Tuftedcheek - Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii
Streaked Tuftedcheek
Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii auritus
Paty Trail, Carpish, Huánuco department, Peru.
A common cloudforest bird found throughout much of the Andes as well as the coastal range of Venezuela. (S8)


Chaco Earthcreeper - Tarphonomus certhioides
Chaco Earthcreeper
Tarphonomus certhioides certhioides
El Tunal, Salta province, Argentina.
Not really related to the Upocerthia earthceepers, from which it was recently separated along with T. harterti. Endemic to the chaco region. (S5)



Wing-banded Hornero - Furnarius figulus
Wing-banded Hornero
Furnarius figulus figulus
Reserva Ecologica de Guapiassu, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Endemic to Brazil, with one race in the East, the other in the Amazon. Very similar to Pale-legged Hornero F. leucopus, but has dark legs. (S6)


Pale-legged Hornero - Furnarius leucopus
Pale-legged Hornero
Furnarius leucopus tricolor
Amazonia Lodge, Madre de Dios region, Peru.
The most widespread hornero in northern South America, though it's likely to be split two or three ways. Compare this Amazonian subspecies to the one in the next photo. (S8)


Pale-legged Hornero - Furnarius leucopus
Pale-legged Hornero
Furnarius leucopus cinnamomeus
Túcume, Lambayeque region, Peru.
The most widespread hornero in northern South America, though some of the isolated subspecies, such as this one, may be split in the future. (S6)


Lesser Hornero - Furnarius minor
Lesser Hornero
Furnarius minor
Island in the Rio Napo near Sacha Lodge, Orellana province, Ecuador.
One of the shyest of all the horneros. It is found exclusively on river islands of the Amazon and major tributaries. (D3)


Rufous Hornero - Furnarius rufus
Rufous Hornero
Furnarius rufus commersoni
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Common and widespread through southeastern South America. (S6)


Rufous Hornero - Furnarius rufus
Rufous Hornero
Furnarius rufus albogularis
Southeast of Sumidouro, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Hornero nests are instantly recognizable and a familiar sight in open areas throughout much of South America. Hornero literally means "oven-builder" in Spanish. (D3)


Rufous Hornero - Furnarius rufus
Rufous Hornero
Furnarius rufus commersoni
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
(S8)


Crested Hornero - Furnarius cristatus
Crested Hornero
Furnarius cristatus
c. 18km NE of JV Gonzales, Salta province, Argentina.
One of the smallest of the horneros, but that crest makes it super-distinctive. It is endemic to chaco region. (S5)















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