GRASS-FINCHES, GRASSQUITS, DARWIN'S FINCHES, OTHERS -   THRAUPIDAE

These have all been transferred to the Thraupidae.


Wedge-tailed Grass-Finch - Emberizoides herbicola
Wedge-tailed Grass-Finch
Emberizoides herbicola sphenurus
Between El Chorro and La Chonta, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This species is found in scattered localities in the Neotropics, mainly in savanna areas. It was first found in Ecuador around 2002, and only occurs in the far south near the Peruvian border. (S6)


Great Pampa-Finch - Embernagra platensis
Great Pampa-Finch
Embernagra platensis platensis
Serra Geral National Park, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.
A widespread species in grasslands of southeastern South America. (S8)


Pale-throated Pampa-Finch - Embernagra longicauda
Pale-throated Pampa-Finch
Embernagra longicauda
Serra de Cipó, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
A Brazilian endemic, found in interior mountain ranges from Bahia to Minas Gerais. (S5)


Blue-black Grassquit - Volatinia jacarina
Blue-black Grassquit
Volatinia jacarina splendens
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. One of the most common and widespread birds of open areas in the Neotropics. (S6)


Blue-black Grassquit - Volatinia jacarina
Blue-black Grassquit
Volatinia jacarina peruviensis
Near Lita, Imbabura province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Blue-black Grassquit - Volatinia jacarina
Blue-black Grassquit
Volatinia jacarina jacarina
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Probably a juvenile male. (S7)



Coal-crested Finch - Charitospiza eucosma
Coal-crested Finch
Charitospiza eucosma
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. This finch is scarce and local in brushland from interior eastern Brazil to northern Argentina. (S6)


Coal-crested Finch - Charitospiza eucosma
Coal-crested Finch
Charitospiza eucosma
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Female. (S7)


Black-masked Finch - Coryphaspiza melanotis
Black-masked Finch
Coryphaspiza melanotis melanotis
Serra da Canastra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
A very local and threatened species of grasslands of (mainly) central South America. (D3)


Pileated Finch - Coryphospingus pileatus Pileated Finch - Coryphospingus pileatus
Pileated Finch
Coryphospingus pileatus pileatus
Serra da Canstra NP, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Male. When his crest is all the way down, the red can be difficult to see. (D3)
Pileated Finch
Coryphospingus pileatus pileatus
Chapada Diamantina, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. She lacks the red crest and usually shows some fain streaking on the breast. (D3)


Red-crested Finch - Coryphospingus cucullatus
Red-crested Finch
Coryphospingus cucullatus rubescens
Chapada dos Guimarães, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. Found widely in SE South America, with several disjunct populations elsewhere on the continent. (S7)


Crimson-breasted Finch - Rhodospingus cruentus
Crimson-breasted Finch
Rhodospingus cruentus
Machalilla National Park, Manabí province, Ecuador.
Male. A colorful Tumbesian endemic, found mainly in western Ecuador and northwestern Peru. It breeds in the rainy season when the desert scrub is green and lush. In the dry season, they disperse northward into more humid areas, and on rare occasions can wander to southern Colombia. (S8)


Crimson-breasted Finch - Rhodospingus cruentus
Crimson-breasted Finch
Rhodospingus cruentus
Machalilla National Park, Manabí province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)




Bananaquit - Coereba flaveola
Bananaquit
Coereba flaveola intermedia
Mirador Rio Blanco, San Miguel de Los Bancos, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
No one really knows where this familiar bird belongs in the taxonomic order. Often it is but in its own monotypic family, the Coerebidae, but more recently the SACC has moved it into the tanagers. (S8)


Bananaquit - Coereba flaveola
Bananaquit
Coereba flaveola chloropyga
Vale das Taquaras Lodge, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
There are 42 subspecies of Bananaquit listed on the Clements checklist. The most distinctive subspecies occur on various Caribbean islands. One obvious difference between the the race in this photo and the previous one is the lack of the white wing speculum. (S8)


Bananaquit - Coereba flaveola
Bananaquit
Coereba flaveola intermedia
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha, Ecuador.
Getting this shot was a total coincidence - it flew by while I was doing multiflash hummer photography to prepare for an upcoming tour. Not totally sharp, but an interesting shot. (S8f)


Yellow-faced Grassquit - Tiaris olivaceus
Yellow-faced Grassquit
Tiaris olivaceus pusillus
Ginger House, Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
Male. (S8)


Yellow-faced Grassquit - Tiaris olivaceus
Yellow-faced Grassquit
Tiaris olivaceus pusillus
Ginger House, Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
Female. (S8)


Dull-colored Grassquit - Tiaris obscurus
Dull-colored Grassquit
Tiaris obscurus pauper
Río Canandé (near the ferry crossing), Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.

A well-named bird, one of the plainest in all the Neotropics. A useful feature is the dusky upper mandible. (S8)


Dull-colored Grassquit - Tiaris obscurus
Dull-colored Grassquit
Tiaris obscurus obscurus
Aguas Calientes, Cusco department, Peru.

This race is much grayer than the one above. (S6)


Sooty Grassquit - Tiaris fuliginosus
Sooty Grassquit
Tiaris fuliginosus
Reserva Ecologica de Guapi Assu, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. This species has an odd distribution, occurring in scattered sites from Colombia to S Brazil and NE Argentina. It seems to be common nowhere. It prefers edge of scrubby forest, often in bamboo. This male was singing and appeared to be defenfing a territory in a patch of non-native bamboo. (S6)


Warbler Finch - Certhidea olivacea
Gray Warbler-Finch
Certhidea fusca mentalis
Genovesa Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
The first of a series of Darwin's Finches that I photographed in Nov 2008 on a trip to the Galapagos Islands. A controversial split of Warbler Finch has been accepted by the SACC, despite the chairman of the committee and a world expert on Darwin's Finches voicing their dissent, see SACC prop 367.  (S5)


Mangrove/Woodpecker Finch - Camarynchus sp. Mangrove/Woodpecker Finch - Camarynchus sp.
Mangrove/Woodpecker Finch
Camarynchus sp.
Punta Espinosa, Fernandina, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Mangrove Finch C. heliobates has not been recorded on Fernandina Island since the early 1970's. These are photos of a bird we saw in the mangroves just across the channel from Playa Negra, a well-known site for Mangrove Finch on Isabela Island. The length of the bill and brownish plumage suggest that it could just be a Woodpecker Finch C. pallidus, but what is it doing in the mangroves? I thought Mangrove Finch was pretty much a Woodpecker Finch that had adapted to live in the mangroves. (S5)
Mangrove/Woodpecker Finch
Camarynchus sp.
Punta Espinosa, Fernandina, Galapagos, Ecuador.


Small Ground-Finch - Geospiza fuliginosa Small Ground-Finch - Geospiza fuliginosa
Small Ground-Finch
Geospiza fuliginosa
Punta Moreno, Isabela Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Male. There is significant variation in beak size among even the same species of Darwin's Finches. Compare this one to the female in the photo to the right. (S5)
Small Ground-Finch
Geospiza fuliginosa
Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Female. (S5)


Medium Ground-Finch - Geospiza fortis
Medium Ground-Finch
Geospiza fortis
Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Male, on the left. The bird on the right is a female Small Ground-Finch G. fuliginosa. (S5)


Large Ground-Finch - Geospiza magnirostris
Large Ground-Finch
Geospiza magnirostris
Genovesa Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Female. Originally mis-ID'd as a Large Cactus-Finch, but the race of that species on Genovesa has a much narrower beak. Thanks to Rasmus Boegh for pointing this out. (S5)


Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch - Geospiza difficilis
Sharp-beaked Ground-Finch
Geospiza difficilis difficilis
Genovesa Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Female. This is the ground-finch with the smallest distribution, found only on a few, mostly outlying islands of the archipelago. (S5)


Common Cactus-Finch - Geospiza scandens
Common Cactus-Finch
Geospiza scandens intermedia
Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Male. A well-named finch that is a specialist of prickly-pear (Opuntia) cactus. They are often seen probing the flowers, and frequently have the yellow, powdery pollen all over their face. (S5)


Common Cactus-Finch - Geospiza scandens
Common Cactus-Finch
Geospiza scandens intermedia
Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Female. (S5)


Large Cactus-Finch - Geospiza conirostris
Large Cactus-Finch
Geospiza conirostris conirostris
Punta Suarez, Española Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Male. This is the nominate race endemic to Española. It has a smaller beak and is similar to Medium Ground-Finch G. fortis, which is not know to occur on the island. (S5)


Large Cactus-Finch - Geospiza conirostris
Large Cactus-Finch
Geospiza conirostris conirostris
Punta Suarez, Española Island, Galapagos, Ecuador.
Female. It is not as tied to cacti as Common Cactus-Finch. (S5)













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