COTINGAS   -   COTINGIDAE


Sharpbill - Oxyruncus cristatus
Sharpbill
Oxyruncus cristatus cristatus
Carlos Botelho SP, São Paulo state, Brazil.
The experts are divided on whether this species belows with the cotingas, or deserves to be in  a monotypic family. SACC voted to separate it, but I'm including it here for convenience. (D2)

Hooded Berryeater - Carpornis cucullata
Hooded Berryeater
Carpornis cucullata
Macaé de Cima, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
A beautiful bird, and a characteristic sound of upland Atlantic Rainforest. It is rather local now, and doesn't occur in some places where you might expect it, such as Itatiaia NP. (D3)


Barred Fruiteater - Pipreola arcuata arcuata
Barred Fruiteater
Pipreola arcuata arcuata
Chingaza NP, Cundinamarca department, Colombia.
Male. (S5)


Golden-breasted Fruiteater - Pipreola aureopectus
Golden-breasted Fruiteater
Pipreola aureopectus festiva
Colonia Tovar, Aragua state, Venezuela.
Male. This is the race endemic to the coastal cordillera of Venezuela, which is slightly brighter below. (D3)


Orange-breasted Fruiteater - Pipreola jucunda
Orange-breasted Fruiteater
Pipreola jucunda
Mashpi, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. A striking bird endemic to the Chocó region of western Colombia and northwestern Ecuador. It inhabits very wet cloudforest on the middle slopes of the Andes. (S8)


Orange-breasted Fruiteater - Pipreola jucunda
Orange-breasted Fruiteater
Pipreola jucunda
Mashpi, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Black-chested Fruiteater - Pipreola lubomirskii
Black-chested Fruiteater
Pipreola lubomirskii
Santa Cecilia trail above Paquisha, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
Male. It primarily occurs on east slope Andean cloudforest in Ecuador, though also makes it into southern Colombia and northern Peru. (S6)


Masked Fruiteater - Pipreola pulchra
Masked Fruiteater
Pipreola pulchra
Villa Rica-Oxapampa Road, Pasco region, Peru.
Male. Endemic to the east slope of the Peruvian Andes. (S8)


Scarlet-breasted Fruiteater - Pipreola frontalis
Scarlet-breasted Fruiteater
Pipreola frontalis squamipectus
WildSumaco Wildlife Sanctuary, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male incubating on a nest, 16-Feb-2009. Some researchers at WildSumaco discovered this nest by fluke, and we could get surprisingly close to it. The male and female (see below) regularly swapped out on the incubation duties. (D3)


Scarlet-breasted Fruiteater - Pipreola frontalis
Scarlet-breasted Fruiteater
Pipreola frontalis squamipectus
WildSumaco Wildlife Sanctuary, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female incubating on a nest, 16-Feb-2009. (D3)


Fiery-throated Fruiteater - Pipreola chlorolepidota
Fiery-throated Fruiteater
Pipreola chlorolepidota
Quebrada Mishquiyacu, San Martín region, Peru.
Male. The smallest fruiteater; it's very scarce along the east slope of the Andes from southern Colombia south through Ecuador and Peru. (S8)


Fiery-throated Fruiteater - Pipreola chlorolepidota
Fiery-throated Fruiteater
Pipreola chlorolepidota
Quebrada Mishquiyacu, San Martín region, Peru.
Female. She seemed to be the mate of the male in the previous photo. (S8)


Red-banded Fruiteater - Pipreola whitelyi
Red-banded Fruiteater
Pipreola whitelyi kathleenae
La Escalera (Sierra de Lema), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Male. It's colored totally differently from other members of the genus, probably because it evolved in isolation in the tepui region. (D3)


Scaled Fruiteater - Ampelioides tschudii
Scaled Fruiteater
Ampelioides tschudii
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador.
Male. A scarce, distinctive, and unique fruiteater of Andean cloudforests from Venzuela to Bolivia. (S7)


Peruvian Plantcutter - Phytotoma raimondii
Peruvian Plantcutter
Phytotoma raimondii
Bosque de Pomac, Lambayeque department, Peru.
Male. Probably a young bird as it shows very little rufous on the underparts. A seriously endangered species, found only in arid woodland in northwestern Peru. (D2)


White-tipped Plantcutter - Phytotoma raimondii
White-tipped Plantcutter
Phytotoma rutila angustirostris
Yavi, Salta province, Argentina.
Male. A locally common species in drier woodland and scrub from Bolivia and Paraguay south to northern Argentina. (S6)


White-tipped Plantcutter - Phytotoma raimondii
White-tipped Plantcutter
Phytotoma rutila angustirostris
Payogasta, Salta provinc, Argentina.
Female. (S6)


Bay-vented Cotinga - Doliornis sclateri
Bay-vented Cotinga
Doliornis sclateri
Bosque Unchog, Huánuco department, Peru.
A very rare and local species, found only in treeline forest in the high Andes of central Peru. (S8)


Red-crested Cotinga - Ampelion rubrocristatus
Red-crested Cotinga
Ampelion rubrocristatus
Papallacta Pass, Pichincha province Ecuador.
These birds are quite common in high Andean forest. The red crest is almost always laid back flat as it is in this photo. It is raised only in display, and even then usually only briefly. (S5)


Chestnut-crested Cotinga - Ampelion rufaxilla
Chestnut-crested Cotinga
Ampelion rufaxilla rufaxilla
Villa Rica-Oxapampa road, Pasco department, Peru.
Far rarer than its congener above, for inexplicable reasons. I have only seen it a couple of times. It is found locally in the Andes from Colombia to Bolivia, and occurs at lower elevations that the previous species. (S8)


Chestnut-crested Cotinga - Ampelion rufaxilla
Chestnut-crested Cotinga
Ampelion rufaxilla rufaxilla
Los Romerillos, above Zumba, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
(S6)


Andean Cock-of-the-rock - Rupicola peruvianus
Andean Cock-of-the-rock
Rupicola peruvianus saturatus
Manu road above San Pedro, Madre de Dios department, Peru.
Male. An iconic South American species. It's amazing how long it took me to finally photograph one. They are quite shy, and while easy to see at a distance, they are hard to get close to. While you can get quite close to them at a lek, they usually display in the pre-dawn hours where there is almost no light to work with. This bird was feeding in a fruiting tree by the side of the road;  this shot was not particularly sharp, but it's a start. (S6)


Andean Cock-of-the-rock - Rupicola peruvianus
Andean Cock-of-the-rock
Rupicola peruvianus aequatorialis
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female. (S7)


Guianan Cock-of-the-rock - Rupicola rupicola Olivaceous Piha - Snowornis cryptolophus
Guianan Cock-of-the-rock
Rupicola rupicola
Iwokrama Forest, Guyana.
Male. He was perched near a lek, but it was the middle of the day, so he wasn't displaying. (D3)
Olivaceous Piha
Snowornis cryptolophus mindoensis
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha prov., Ecuador.
Amazingly this species will now seasonally visit the fruit feeder in the reserve, though this shot was taken away from the feeders. (D3)


Purple-throated Fruitcrow - Querula purpurata
Purple-throated Fruitcrow
Querula purpurata
Río Silanche Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Purple-throated Fruitcrow - Querula purpurata
Purple-throated Fruitcrow
Querula purpurata
Rio Palenque Science Station, Los Ríos province, Ecuador.
Male. (S7)


Bare-necked Umbrellabird - Cephalopterus glabricollis
Bare-necked Umbrellabird
Cephalopterus glabricollis
La Selva OTS, Heredia province, Costa Rica.
This is probably a juvenile male. While not visible in this photo, from some angles it showed a small red spot on the throat. This is a rare and threatened species found only in Costa Rica and western Panama. It breeds at middle elevations in the mountains, but disperses into the adjacent lowlands during the non-breeding season. Photo taken on 25 Jan 2011. (S6)


Capuchinbird - Perissocephalus tricolor
Capuchinbird
Perissocephalus tricolor
5 km west of San Isidro, Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Male. One of the strangest birds in all of South America. If you haven't seen one (and even if you have), check out the incredible footage on David Attenborough's Life of Birds. (D3)


Spangled Cotinga - Cotinga cayana
Spangled Cotinga
Cotinga cayana
Sacha Lodge, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Male. It was perched in the tower tree. This is a bird that stays high in the canopy, so it's hard enough to see, never mind photograph, from the forest floor. (D2)


Banded Cotinga - Cotinga maculata
Banded Cotinga
Cotinga maculata
RPPN Estação Veracal, Porto Seguro, Bahia state, Brazil.
Male. One of the world's rarest cotingas, restricted to a handful of sites in the Atlantic Rainforest of eastern Brazil. This bird was perched in the top of a fairly distant tree, and this photo was digiscoped at quite high power. (D6)


Chestnut-capped Piha - Lipaugus weberi
Chestnut-capped Piha
Lipaugus weberi
Chestnut-capped Piha reserve, Anorí, Antioquia department, Colombia.
The newest member of the cotinga family; this species was described only in 2001. It is found only in cloudforest at the the northern end of the Central Andes in Colombia. The chestnut cap is often very hard to see in the field, but it is barely visible in this shot. (S6)


Rufous Piha - Lipaugus unirufus
Rufous Piha
Lipaugus unirufus unirufus
Esquinas Lodge, La Gamba, Puntarenas province, Costa Rica.
(S8)


Screaming Piha - Lipaugus vociferans Cinnamon-vented Piha - Lipaugus lanioides
Screaming Piha
Lipaugus vociferans
Rio Grande, Bolívar state, Venezuela.
One of the most distinctive voices of Amazonian rainforest. It's also a commonly used in the background of Hollywood films, usually taking place far away from the Amazon! (D3)
Cinnamon-vented Piha
Lipaugus lanioides
Intervales State Park, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Endemic to Southeast Brazil in the Atlantic Rainforest. (D3)


Rose-collared Piha - Lipaugus streptophorus
Rose-collared Piha
Lipaugus streptophorus
La Escalera (Sierra de Lema), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
Female. The females lack to rosy collar, but have a cinnamon vent, which is barely visible here. (D3)


Black-and-gold Cotinga - Tijuca atra
Black-and-gold Cotinga
Tijuca atra
Pico da Caledônia, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Endemic to the highlands of Southeast Brazil. Males perch for extended periods giving a repetitive, high-pitched whistling song that is a characteristic sound of the high mountains. Click below to listen. (S6)


Gray-winged Cotinga - Tijuca condita
Gray-winged Cotinga
Tijuca condita
Pico da Caledônia, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. This rather dull cotinga has a tiny range in the mountains of SE Brazil, where it is restricted to a very narrow band of stunted forest just below treeline. (S6)


Bearded Bellbird - Procnias averano
Bearded Bellbird
Procnias averano carnobarba
La Escalera (Sierra de Lema), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
A singing male. (D3)


Bare-throated Bellbird - Procnias nudicollis
Bare-throated Bellbird
Procnias nudicollis
Estação Veracruz, Porto Seguro, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. The males are usually a lot more conspicuous, sitting on open perches, but I don't have a good shot of him yet. (D3)


Black-tipped Cotinga - Carpodectes hopkei
Black-tipped Cotinga
Carpodectes hopkei
Humedal de Yalare, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Male. The black tips are best seen from behind, but you can see them on the left wing if you look carefully. (D3)


Black-tipped Cotinga - Carpodectes hopkei
Black-tipped Cotinga
Carpodectes hopkei
Humedal de Yalare, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Female. A pretty awful photo, I know, but I added it since I could not find any other shots of the female on the web. (S8)


Snowy Cotinga - Carpodectes nitidus
Snowy Cotinga
Carpodectes nitidus
La Selva OTS, Heredia province, Costa Rica,
Male. A very distant shot (this image has not been resampled - these are the actual pixels). This beautiful cotinga lives in lowland Caribbean rainforest from Honduras to Panama. (S8)


Pompadour Cotinga - Xipholena punicea
Pompadour Cotinga
Xipholena punicea
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. A striking bird of the Amazonian and Guianan rainforests of South America. (S8)


Pompadour Cotinga - Xipholena punicea
Pompadour Cotinga
Xipholena punicea
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Juvenile male. He is starting to show darker red plumage on the breast and undertail coverts. He was participating in a communal display with two adult males. (S6)


White-tailed Cotinga - Xipholena lamellipennis
White-tailed Cotinga
Xipholena lamellipennis
Serra dos Carajás, Pará state, Brazil.
Male. It occurs widely in the eastern part of the Amazon basin, but there are few easily accessible places where it can be found. They are regularly found in Carajás, especially in hilly areas where you can get clear views of the canopy. (D3)


White-winged Cotinga - Xipholena atropurpurea
White-winged Cotinga
Xipholena atropurpurea
Estação Veracruz, Porto Seguro, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. An endangered cotinga of the Atlantic Forest of coastal Brazil. The male is similar to the previous species, but lacks the white tail. (D3)


Bare-necked Fruitcrow - Gymnoderus foetidus
Bare-necked Fruitcrow
Gymnoderus foetidus
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. Another characteristic Amazonian bird. While you can often see them flying over, you usually need to be in a canopy tower or walkway to get a nice, close view like this one. (D3)


Swallow-tailed Cotinga - Phibalura flavirostris
Swallow-tailed Cotinga
Phibalura flavirostris flavirostris
Caraça reserve, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.
Males. One of the most beautiful and distinctive birds in all of South America. SACC puts this in Incertae Sedis. (D3)

Swallow-tailed Cotinga - Phibalura flavirostris
Swallow-tailed Cotinga
Phibalura flavirostris flavirostris
Intervales State Park, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Female on a nest; it was only about a meter off the ground in a small bush at the edge of a clearing. (Date: 1 October 2007). (D3)











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