ANTPITTAS   -   GRALLARIDAE


Undulated Antpitta - Grallaria squamigera
Undulated Antpitta
Grallaria squamigera canicauda
Owlet Lodge, Abra Patricia, Amazonas department, Peru.
The new antpitta feeding station has been fairly successful, attracting this Undulated Antpitta most mornings. I hope they can entice some of the endemic antpittas to come in, which currently are quite a pain to see. The bird comes in only right at dawn when there is almost no light. I photographed this on a tripod and only had a speed of 1/8 of a second at 3200 ISO. (S6)


Giant Antpitta - Grallaria gigantea
Giant Antpitta
Grallaria gigantea fagani
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
That's Maria, the bird that made Angel Paz famous in the birding world. "She" was the first of the antpittas to lose fear of humans and come eat earthworms off the trail. (S6)




Giant Antpitta - Grallaria gigantea
Giant Antpitta
Grallaria gigantea fagani
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha, Ecuador.
(S8)


Moustached Antpitta - Grallaria alleni
Moustached Antpitta
Grallaria alleni andaquiensis
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Taking a worm that was put out for it. It ran of without eating the worm, so I suspect it was feeding young at a nest nearby (date: 26 Feb 2014). (S8)




Moustached Antpitta - Grallaria alleni
Moustached Antpitta
Grallaria alleni andaquiensis
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Scaled Antpitta - Grallaria guatimalensis
Scaled Antpitta
Grallaria guatimalensis regulus
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This bird regularly comes in to the forest blind near the lodge. It tends to come in right at dawn or dusk when there is littled light, and it wasn't until I got f/2.8 lens that I could finally get some decent shots. (S7)




Scaled Antpitta - Grallaria guatimalensis
Scaled Antpitta
Grallaria guatimalensis regulus
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This appears to be an immature bird based on the streaking and mottling on the head and breast. (S8)


Scaled Antpitta - Grallaria guatimalensis
Scaled Antpitta
Grallaria guatimalensis regulus
Tandayapa Bird Lodge, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
25 January 2008. This bird was brooding two moderately-developed nestlings. The nest was about 150 m from the lodge, a messy clump of vegetation on a branch about 1.5 m off the ground. (D3)


Plain-backed Antpitta - Grallaria haplonota
Plain-backed Antpitta
Grallaria haplonota chaplinae
WildSumaco, Napo, Ecuador
Not the most attractive antpitta species... it was coming to a worm feeder along one of the lodge trails. (S11)


Ochre-striped Antpitta - Grallaria dignissima
Ochre-striped Antpitta
Grallaria dignissima
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
This is one of the hardest antpittas to see. Weirdly, it was the first species of antpitta I ever saw, in August 1999. Despite hearing them on numerous occasions, I didn't see another one until I photographed this bird in August 2010, eleven years later! A poor shot, it's a pity I didn't have my 300 2.8 for this one, the 100-400 simply couldn't handle the low light. (S6)



Chestnut-crowned Antpitta - Grallaria ruficapilla
Chestnut-crowned Antpitta
Grallaria ruficapilla ruficapilla
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A common species in cloudforest in the northern Andes. This one was coming in to eat worms at Angel Paz's now-famous private reserve. (S8)




Chestnut-crowned Antpitta - Grallaria ruficapilla
Chestnut-crowned Antpitta
Grallaria ruficapilla ruficapilla
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Another shot of the same bird as above. (S8)



Watkins's Antpitta - Grallaria watkinsi
Watkins's Antpitta
Grallaria watkinsi
Jorupe reserve, Loja province, Ecuador.
(S8)


Santa Marta Antpitta - Grallaria bangsi
Santa Marta Antpitta
Grallaria bangsi
El Dorado reserve, Santa Marta Mountains, Magdalena department, Colombia.
This endemic Santa Marta Antpitta is the latest in the series of antpittas that have now been coaxed out into the open by feeding it worms every day, a phenomenom made famous by Angel Paz in Ecuador. (S5)



Jocotoco Antpitta - Grallaria ridgelyi
Jocotoco Antpitta
Grallaria ridgelyi
Tapichalaca Reserve, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
This fabulous bird has now become very easy to see since the park rangers started feeding them earthworms every day. Only discovered in 1997, it inhabits only a very small range of temperate Andean cloudforest in far southern Ecuador and extreme northern Peru. (S5)



Jocotoco Antpitta - Grallaria ridgelyi
Jocotoco Antpitta
Grallaria ridgelyi
Tapichalaca Reserve, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
The brown scaling on the crown indicates that this is a young bird. (S5)


Chestnut-naped Antpitta - Grallaria nuchalis
Chestnut-naped Antpitta
Grallaria nuchalis nuchalis
Tapichalaca Reserve, Zamora-Chinchipe province, Ecuador.
Another visitor, along with the Jocotoco, at the worm feeders. It is less reliable, sometimes only coming in briefly before being chased off by the larger and dominant Jocotocos. (S5)



White-throated Antpitta - Grallaria albigula
White-throated Antpitta
Grallaria albigula
Calilegua NP, Jujuy province, Argentina.
Hardly a good photo, but there are not many out there of this species. It is found in cloudforest from extreme SE Peru to NW Argentina. (S5)



Yellow-breasted Antpitta - Grallaria flavotincta
Yellow-breasted Antpitta
Grallaria flavotincta
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Another one of the antpittas that has learned to come in and eat worms at Angel Paz's reserve. He call's this one "Willy". Yellow-breasted Antpitta is a Chocó endemic, restricted to middle elevations of the Andes of NW Ecuador and W Colombia. It is very similar to the next species, but has a different song. (S6)



White-bellied Antpitta - Grallaria hypoleuca
White-bellied Antpitta
Grallaria hypoleuca castanea
Cabañas San Isidro, Napo province, Ecuador.
A blurry shot because it was dark and always moving. My videoof it is better. It was picking up worms that were put out for it on a trail near the lodge. Rather than eat the worms on the spot, it picked up as many as it could carry and hopped away. (D3)



Rufous Antpitta - Grallaria rufula
Rufous Antpitta
Grallaria rufula rufula
Yanacocha, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This bird comes in to a worm feeder at the reserve and has become ridiculously friendly. The Rufous Antpitta complex is being studied by several ornithologists right now, and it is likely they will recommend several splits. I also believe there is at least one undesribed species involved as well; it will be very interesting to see the results when they are published. (S7)


Chestnut Antpitta - Grallaria blakei
Chestnut Antpitta
Grallaria blakei
Apalla, Junín department, Peru.
Endemic to mid and high elevation cloudforest of northern and central Peru. The bird in this photo is near the southern limit of its range. The form here is vocally distinct and has an unbarred belly. It may eventually be described as a new species. (S8)


Tawny Antpitta - Grallaria quitensis
Tawny Antpitta
Grallaria quitensis quitensis
Papallacta pass, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Unlike most antpittas, this one is usually easy to see. It is very common in and near the páramo in the high mountains on either side of Quito - note the latin name. (S5)



Tawny Antpitta - Grallaria quitensis
Tawny Antpitta
Grallaria quitensis alticola
Chingaza NP, Cundinamarca department, Colombia.
This isolated subspecies, found in the eastern Andes of Colombia, looks and sounds different from the other races such as the one above, and likely deserves full species status. Alticola shows distinct white mottling on the underparts and is somewhat darker on the upperparts. The song is very distinctive; I haven't recorded it myself, but have included one of Andrew Spencer's recordings below. (S6)



"Fenwick's" Antpitta - Grallaria sp. nov.
Urrao Antpitta
Grallaria urraoensis
Dusky Starfrontlet Reserve, Antioquia department, Colombia.
This bird was discovered a few years ago, and it was coming to a worm feeder near the reserve cabin. It was described by two different sets of authors and given two different names; SACC voted to accept this one. The other name is Fenwick's Antpitta Grallaria fenwickorum. (S5)


Brown-banded Antpitta - Grallaria milleri
Brown-banded Antpitta
Grallaria milleri milleri
Rio Blanco Reserva Natural, Manizales, Caldas, Colombia
Not the most photogenic antpitta... it is however endemic to Colombia, and there is no doubt in my mind that Rio Blanco is the easiest place to see it, where several birds regularly visit worm feeders. (S14)


Streak-chested Antpitta - Hylopezus perspicillatus
Streak-chested Antpitta
Hylopezus perspicillatus perspicillatus
Plantation Road, Soberania NP, Panamá province, Panama.
An attractive antpitta found from Honduras to NW Ecuador. This bird was singing from a low perch. (S8)


Streak-chested Antpitta - Hylopezus perspicillatus
Streak-chested Antpitta
Hylopezus perspicillatus periophthalmicus
Playa de Oro, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
I was chasing after this off-trail in the very dark understory of the wet Chocó rainforest. Shot handheld at 1/20 sec with a bit of flash to light things up - it was tough to get any kind of a decent shot under those conditions with the gear I had at the time, so considerint that it did not come out too badly. (S5f)



Alta Floresta Antpitta - Hylopezus whittakeri
Alta Floresta Antpitta
Hylopezus whittakeri
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Recently described, see abstract here. Formerly considered part of Spotted Antpitta H. macularius. (S6)


Thicket Antpitta - Hylopezus dives
Thicket Antpitta
Hylopezus dives dives
Arenal Observatory Lodge, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
Found in rainforest from Honduras to W Colombia. There is also one record from NW Ecuador. (S8)


White-lored Antpitta - Hylopezus fulviventris
White-lored Antpitta
Hylopezus fulviventris fulviventris
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador
This bird had just started coming into a worm feeder not far from the lodge during my visit in late May 2015. If it keeps coming, they will make the viewing area a little cleaner to allow for some better backgrounds; still, I had never seen this mega skulker anywhere near as well as this, never mind photographed it. (S8)


White-browed Antpitta - Hylopezus ochroleucus
White-browed Antpitta
Hylopezus ochroleucus
Araripe National Forest, Ceará state, Brazil.
Another blurry shot, but this time because it was constantly rocking back and forth. This species lives in dry forest in northeastern Brazil. (D3)



Tepui Antpitta - Myrmothera simplex
Tepui Antpitta
Myrmothera simplex simplex
La Escalera (Sierra de Lema), Bolívar state, Venezuela.
It was a bit lucky to find this one sitting on one perch for a long time, singing away. It was so dark that I had to take dozens of shots before one came out sharp. (D3)



Ochre-breasted Antpitta - Grallaricula flavirostris
Ochre-breasted Antpitta
Grallaricula flavirostris mindoensis
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
A little antpitta found from Costa Rica to Bolivia; this subspecies is endemic to NW Ecuador. (S8)



Ochre-breasted Antpitta - Grallaricula flavirostris
Ochre-breasted Antpitta
Grallaricula flavirostris mindoensis
Refugio Paz de las Aves, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Angel has dubbed this bird "Shakira" for its habit of rocking back and forth in a rather seductive way... (S8)


Ochre-breasted Antpitta - Grallaricula flavirostris
Ochre-breasted Antpitta
Grallaricula flavirostris zarumae
Buenaventura reserve, El Oro province, Ecuador.
This race is endemic to SW Ecuador. It has a very pale bill and brighter underparts. (S7)


Ochre-breasted Antpitta - Grallaricula flavirostris
Ochre-breasted Antpitta
Grallaricula flavirostris flavirostris
WildSumaco, Napo, Ecuador.
Birds from the east slope in Ecuador are generally considered to be part of the nominate subspecies, though the amount of individual variation leads me to wonder if all the two other Ecuadorian subspecies (above) should be merged with the nominate. (S11)


Ochre-fronted Antpitta - Grallaricula ochraceifrons
Ochre-fronted Antpitta
Grallaricula ochraceifrons
ACP Abra Patricia-Alto Nieva, San Martín region, Peru.
Male. This beautiful antpitta is endemic to a small area of the Andes of northern Peru. It was described only in 1983. The male, shown here, has more extensive rufous on the head than the female. (S8)


Rusty-breasted Antpitta - Grallaricula ferrugineipectus
Rusty-breasted Antpitta
Grallaricula ferrugineipectus leymebambae
Reserva Geobotánica Pululahua, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
This species is in dire need of a taxonomic revision. The races occurring in Colombia and Venezuela are vocally very different from leymebambae, which occurs in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. There seem to be habitat differences as well, but so far there isn't any published data to support the split. I originally found this bird here on 18 April 2003, and it was a significant northward range extension of leymebambae. Ten years later I went back with a better camera and got this shot. (S8)



Slate-crowned Antpitta - Grallaricula nana
Slate-crowned Antpitta
Grallaricula nana occidentalis
RNA Loro Orejiamarillo, above Jardín, Antioquia department, Colombia.
This species inhabits bamboo thickets in temperate forest. It is found in the Andes from Venezuela to northern Peru, and also occurs in the coastal range of Venezuela. Subspecies follows Donegan, Thomas M. Geographical variation in Slate- crowned Antpitta Grallaricula nana, with two new subspecies, from Colombia and VenezuelaBull. BOC. 2008. (S6)



Sucre Antpitta - Grallaricula cumanensis
Sucre Antpitta
Grallaricula  cumanensis pariae
Slopes of Cerro Humo, Paria peninsula, Sucre state, Venezuela.
Note the white belly and pale lower mandible, typical of this species, which has now been split from Slate-crowned Antpitta G. nana; see SACC proposal 421. (D3)



Sucre Antpitta - Grallaricula cumanensis
Sucre Antpitta
Grallaricula cumanensis pariae
Slopes of Cerro Humo, Paria peninsula, Sucre state, Venezuela.
The same bird as above, but a frontal view. (D3)














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