ANTBIRDS   -   THAMNOPHILIDAE   -   PART 5

"Classic" antbirds


Dusky Antbird - Cercomacroides tyrannina
Dusky Antbird
Cercomacroides tyrannina rufiventris
Old Gamboa Road, Panama province, Panama.
Male. This is a common species throughout much of its large range from southern Mexico to northern South America, but it took manny years before I was finally able to photograph it. It tends to skulk in dark thickets and is very hard to nail down. (S8)


Black Antbird - Cercomacroides serva
Black Antbird
Cercomacroides serva serva
Bellandia Lodge, Pastaza, Ecuador
Male. (S8)


Blackish Antbird - Cercomacroides nigrescens
Blackish Antbird
Cercomacroides nigrescens aequatorialis
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. This species is found widely in the Amazon as well as lower east Andean slopes. (S7)


Blackish Antbird - Cercomacra nigrescens
Blackish Antbird
Cercomacra nigrescens aequatorialis
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female. (S7)


Mato Grosso Antbird - Cercomacra melanaria
Mato Grosso Antbird
Cercomacra melanaria
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Male. This species is common in the Pantanal, and also occurs westward into central Bolivia. (S8)


Mato Grosso Antbird - Cercomacra melanaria
Mato Grosso Antbird
Cercomacra melanaria
Pousada Piuval, Pantanal, Mato Grosso state, Brazil.
Female. (S8)


Jet Antbird - Cercomacra nigricans
Jet Antbird
Cercomacra nigricans
Reserva Ecologica Manglares-Churute, Guayas province, Ecuador.
Male. This antbird is found in NW South America and eastern Panama. It seems to prefer forest that is at least seasonally dry. (S8)


Jet Antbird - Cercomacra nigricans
Jet Antbird
Cercomacra nigricans
Reserva Ecologica Manglares-Churute, Guayas province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


White-browed Antbird - Myrmoborus leucophrys
White-browed Antbird
Myrmoborus leucophrys leucophrys
Cotundo, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. A common Amazonian species. (S6)


Ash-breasted Antbird - Myrmoborus lugubris
Ash-breasted Antbird
Myrmoborus lugubris stictopterus
Anavilhanas Archipelago, Amazonas state, Brazil.
Female. Found in dense vegetation along the largers rivers in the Amazon system. (D3)


Bare-crowned Antbird - Gymnocichla nudiceps
Bare-crowned Antbird
Gymnocichla nudiceps sanctamartae
El Paujil reserve, Santander department, Colombia.
Male. "Bald Antbird" would have been a much cooler name. It is found in lowland rainforest from Belize to Colombia. (S5)


Silvered Antbird - Sclateria naevia
Silvered Antbird
Sclateria naevia naevia
Near Guaraunos, Sucre state, Venezuela.
Male. An example of one of the eastern races, which are extensively streaked below. (D3)


Black-headed Antbird - Percnostola rufifrons
Black-headed Antbird
Percnostola rufifrons minor
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Female. This subspecies is restricted to eastern Colombia, southern Venezuela, and northwestern Brazil. It is treated by some authors as a separate species, Amazonas Antbird, due mainly to plumage differences in the female; the most obvious feature is the brown crown as opposed to black or gray. Songs of the various races are similar, and while they may differ in pace, that is not really enough to justify splits without other evidence. (S6)


Plumbeous Antbird - Myrmelastes hyperythrus
Plumbeous Antbird
Myrmelastes hyperythrus
Güeppí-Sekime National Park, Loreto region, Peru.
Male. (S8)


Spot-winged Antbird - Myrmelastes leucostigma
Spot-winged Antbird
Myrmelastes leucostigma subplumbeus
Bellandia Lodge, Pastaza province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


White-bellied Antbird - Myrmeciza longipes
White-bellied Antbird
Myrmeciza longipes panamensis
Old Gamboa Road, Panama province, Panama
Male. Found in eastern Panama and northern South America; this antbird can be common in the understory of dry and semi-humid forest. It avoids areas of extensive humid forest. (S6)


Chestnut-backed Antbird - Poliocrania exsul
Chestnut-backed Antbird
Poliocrania exsul maculifer
Buenaventura Reserve, El Oro, Ecuador.
Male. Common in lowland rainforest from Central America to western Ecuador. (S8)


Chestnut-backed Antbird - Poliocrania exsul
Chestnut-backed Antbird
Poliocrania exsul cassini
El Valle, Chocó department, Colombia.
Male. (S8)


Gray-headed Antbird - Ampelornis griseiceps
Gray-headed Antbird
Ampelornis griseiceps
Utuana Reserve, Loja, Ecuador.
One of the rarest and most threatened of all the antbirds, inhabiting a very small area in southern Ecuador and northwestern Peru. It seems to require semi-humid forest with a dense bamboo understory, and almost all of it's habitat has been cleared. It occurs in only a few protected areas, including the Jorupe and El Tundo reserves in Ecuador and the Tumbes Reserved Zone in Peru. (S7)


Gray-headed Antbird - Ampelornis griseiceps
Gray-headed Antbird
Ampelornis griseiceps
Utuana Reserve, Loja, Ecuador.
Same bird, but a different angle. (S7)


Magdalena Antbird - Sipia palliata
Magdalena Antbird
Sipia palliata
Rio Claro, Doradal, Antioquia department, Colombia.
Male. SACC accepted a proposal to split this taxon from Dull-mantled Antbird M. laemosticta of Central America (prop. 475), based mainly on differences in voice. (S6)


Esmeraldas Antbird - Sipia nigricauda
Esmeraldas Antbird
Sipia nigricauda
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. This bird is a Chocó endemic, found only in western Colombia and western Ecuador. (S8)


Stub-tailed Antbird - Sipia berlepschi
Stub-tailed Antbird
Sipia berlepschi
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Male. This antbird is a Chocó endemic, found locally in wet forest of NW Ecuador and W Colombia. (S8)


Stub-tailed Antbird - Sipia berlepschi
Stub-tailed Antbird
Sipia berlepschi
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Ferruginous-backed Antbird - Myrmoderus ferrugineus
Ferruginous-backed Antbird
Myrmoderus ferrugineus ferrugineus
c.60km north of Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil.
Male. What a bird! Certainly one of the most handsome of the antbirds, and one of my favorite digiscoped photos. (D3)


White-bibbed Antbird - Myrmoderus loricatus
White-bibbed Antbird
Myrmoderus loricatus
Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Endemic to Atlantic Rainforest in eastern Brazil. (S8)


Squamate Antbird - Myrmoderus squamosus
Squamate Antbird
Myrmoderus squamosus
Perequê, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. A beautiful antbird of the Atlantic Rainforest. It is endemic to SE Brazil, replacing the previous species to the south. (S7)


White-shouldered Antbird - Akletos melanoceps
White-shouldered Antbird
Akletos melanoceps
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Female. As is true with most antbirds, the females sing quite frequently, though perhaps not as often as the male. The male is all black with some white feathers under the shoulders, though they are often concealed. This species is restricted to the western third of the Amazon region. (S6)


Sooty Antbird - Hafferia fortis
Sooty Antbird
Hafferia fortis fortis
Zancudococha, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. A fairly common rainforest species found throughout the western part of the Amazon basin. (S8)


Immaculate Antbird - Hafferia zeledoni
Zeledon's (Immaculate) Antbird
Hafferia zeledoni berlepschi
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Male. I suspect it had a nest nearby, but I didn't find it. (S8)


Immaculate Antbird - Hafferia zeledoni
Zeledon's (Immaculate) Antbird
Hafferia zeledoni berlepschi
Milpe Bird Sanctuary, Pichincha province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Black-throated Antbird - Myrmophylax atrothorax
Black-throated Antbird
Myrmophylax atrothorax tenebrosa
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Male. This was the first time I had ever encountered this species in Ecuador; I don't know why it is so rare there. It was incredibly hard to photograph. A storm was looming so there was almost no light. I manually focused and shot handheld at 1/30 sec and at ISO 8000 - no, it's not a great shot, but under the circumstances I really couldn't do any better. (S8)


Gray-bellied Antbird - Ammonastes pelzelni
Gray-bellied Antbird
Ammonastes pelzelni
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. One of the most poorly known of all the antbirds due to the remoteness of its range. It occurs in eastern Colombia, southern Venezuela, and northwestern Brazil, where it seems restricted to white sand forests. (S6)


White-plumed Antbird - Pithys albifrons
White-plumed Antbird
Pithys albifrons peruviana
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
One of the most beautiful of all antbirds. It is a "professional" ant follower and is rarely seen away from antswarms. It's found in rainforest east of the Andes and mainly north of the Amazon, but does occur south of the Amazon in Peru. This photo was handheld at 1/40 sec at 3200 ISO and did not come out very sharp - I hope to improve on it with the better gear I have now. (S6)


Bicolored Antbird - Gymnopithys leucaspis
Bicolored Antbird
Gymnopithys bicolor bicolor
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
This species is a "professional" antswarm follower. (S8)


Bicolored Antbird - Gymnopithys leucaspis
Bicolored Antbird
Gymnopithys bicolor bicolor
Plantation Road, Soberania National Park, Panama province, Panama.
(S8)


Bare-eyed Antbird - Rhegmatorhina gymnops
Bare-eyed Antbird
Rhegmatorhina gymnops
Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso, Brazil.
Male. This beautiful ant-following antbird is endemic to Brazil, where it is restricted to the southeastern Amazon region. Cristalino is arguably the best place in the world to find it. Shooting it handheld in the dark forest understory was a challenge, and I was happy to get anything at all under these conditions: 1/25 sec, f/4, 6400 ISO. Once again I was impressed with this camera and lens. (S8)


Chestnut-crested Antbird - Rhegmatorhina cristata
Chestnut-crested Antbird
Rhegmatorhina cristata
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
A poor and distant photo taken in heavy rain in the very dark forest understory, but there aren't many shots of this rare and localized antbird. It is restricted to part of the Rio Negro drainage in eastern Colombia and northwestern Brazil. It might occur in Venezuela, but as of yet has not been recorded there. (S6)


Spotted Antbird - Hylophylax naevioides
Spotted Antbird
Hylophylax naevioides naevioides
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Ecuador.
Male. This species occurs in lowland rainforest from Honduras to western Ecuador. (S8)


Spotted Antbird - Hylophylax naevioides
Spotted Antbird
Hylophylax naevioides naevioides
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Ecuador.
Female. (S8)


Spot-backed Antwren - Herpsilochmus dorsimaculatus
Spot-backed Antbird
Hylophylax naevius naevius
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. One of the most common and widespread antbirds of the Amazon. (S6)


Dot-backed Antbird - Hylophylax punctulatus
Dot-backed Antbird
Hylophylax punctulatus
Sani Lodge, Sucumbíos province, Ecuador.
Female. A widespread Amazonian species, often found near water. (S8)


Common Scale-backed Antbird - Willisornis poecilinotus
Common Scale-backed Antbird
Willisornis poecilinotus lepidonota
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Male. (S6)


Xingu Scale-backed Antbird - Willisornis vidua
Xingu Scale-backed Antbird
Willisornis vidua
Serra dos Carajás, Pará state, Brazil.
Male. Split from Common Scale-backed Antbird (above), see SACC Prop. 495. This is one of my favorite digiscoped photos. (D3)


Ocellated Antbird - Phaenostictus mcleannani
Ocellated Antbird
Phaenostictus mcleannani mcleannani
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
This bird was attending a big antswarm, and was amazingly approachable, showing no fear at all of my precense. (S8)


Ocellated Antbird - Phaenostictus mcleannani
Ocellated Antbird
Phaenostictus mcleannani mcleannani
Cerro Azul, Panama province, Panama.
The same bird as in the photo above. (S8)


Ocellated Antbird - Phaenostictus mcleannani
Ocellated Antbird
Phaenostictus mcleannani mcleannani
El Almejal Lodge, El Valle, Chocó department, Colombia.
One of my favorite antbirds; it lives in lowland rainforest in Central America, western Colombia, and northwestern Ecuador. It is a "professional" ant follower, but I did not notice any ants near this bird. (S8)



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