ANTBIRDS   -   THAMNOPHILIDAE   -   PART 4

Antvireos and other miscellaneous thamnophilids


Spot-breasted Antvireo - Dysithamnus stictothorax
Spot-breasted Antvireo
Dysithamnus stictothorax
Reserva Ecoligica de Guapi Assu, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Male. A common bird of the Atlantic Rainforest region, both in lowlands and mountains. (S5f)


Plain Antvireo - Dysithamnus mentalis
Plain Antvireo
Dysithamnus mentalis aequatorialis
Río Palenque Science Station, Los Ríos province, Ecuador.
Male. A common bird in tropical forests throughout much of the Neotropics, but for some reason it is absent from the Amazon. (S7)


Plain Antvireo - Dysithamnus mentalis
Plain Antvireo
Dysithamnus mentalis aequatorialis
Río Palenque Science Station, Los Ríos province, Ecuador..
Female. (S7)


Streak-crowned Antvireo - Dysithamnus striaticeps
Streak-crowned Antvireo
Dysithamnus striaticeps
Arenal Observatory Lodge, Alajuela province, Costa Rica.
Male. A Central American endemic, found in rainforest from Honduras to Costa Rica. (S8)


Spot-crowned Antvireo - Dysithamnus puncticeps
Spot-crowned Antvireo
Dysithamnus puncticeps flemmingi
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Male. It usually inhabits the subcanopy, but this bird came down unusually low into a bush on the side of the road allowing eye-level photos. This species is found in lowland and foothill rainforest from Costa Rica to NW Ecuador. (S7)


Spot-crowned Antvireo - Dysithamnus puncticeps
Spot-crowned Antvireo
Dysithamnus puncticeps flemmingi
La Unión, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador.
Female. She's mostly the same pattern as the male, but brown instead of gray. (S7)


Rufous-backed Antvireo - Dysithamnus xanthopterus
Rufous-backed Antvireo
Dysithamnus xanthopterus
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. A striking antvireo endemic to the highlands of Southeast Brazil. (S5f)


White-streaked Antvireo - Dysithamnus leucostictus
White-streaked Antvireo
Dysithamnus leucostictus leucostictus
WildSumaco, Napo province, Ecuador.
Male. A scarce and local species on the east slope of the Andes from Colombia to N Peru. There is also a population in N Venezuela which is treated by some authorities as a separate species. (S7)


Stripe-backed Antbird - Myrmorchilus strigilatus
Stripe-backed Antbird
Myrmorchilus strigilatus strigilatus
Palmeiras, Bahia state, Brazil.
Female. (S6)


Black Bushbird - Neoctantes niger
Black Bushbird
Neoctantes niger
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. A scarce antbird found mainly in the western Amazon, and locally elsewhere. (S6)


Black Bushbird - Neoctantes niger
Black Bushbird
Neoctantes niger
15 km east of Archidona, Napo province, Ecuador.
Female. (S6)



Ferruginous Antbird - Drymophila ferruginea
Ferruginous Antbird
Drymophila ferruginea
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. The Drymophila antbirds are some of the neatest and prettiest members of the antbird family. There are eight of them in the world, six of them are found only in the Atlantic Forest region, and four of them are endemic to Southeast Brazil, including this one. Ferruginous Antbird is one of the most common and easy to see, often foraging right in the open and not requiring any playback to see. (S5f)


Bertoni's Antbird - Drymophila rubricollis
Bertoni's Antbird
Drymophila rubricollis
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. A very similar-looking species to the Ferruginous Antbird D. ferruginea above, and they were formerly considered conspecific. They are sometimes even found together in the same bamboo patch. Vocally they are very different. The males can be hard to separate by plumage, but Bertoni's on average has a paler belly. (S6)


Bertoni's Antbird - Drymophila rubricollis
Bertoni's Antbird
Drymophila rubricollis
Itatiaia NP, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Female. She has a brown crown, which makes here easier to identify by plumage than the male. (S6)


Rufous-tailed Antbird - Drymophila genei
Rufous-tailed Antbird
Drymophila genei
Pico da Caledônia, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Endemic to SE Brazil. This species ranges at the highest elevations in the Atlantic Forest, especially in stunted forest just below treeline. (S5)


Ochre-rumped Antbird - Drymophila ochropyga
Ochre-rumped Antbird
Drymophila ochropyga
Vale das Taquaras, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Also endemic to SE Brazil, where it prefers dense bamboo patches in the mountains. (S7)


Dusky-tailed Antbird - Drymophila malura
Dusky-tailed Antbird
Drymophila malura
Pico da Caledônia, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.
Male. Unlike the other Drymophilas, it isn't really a forest bird. It prefers scrubby clearings. Perhaps for this reason, it is also a bit more widespread than its congeners in the Atlantic Forest region, getting into NE Argentina and S Paraguay. (S6)


Scaled Antbird - Drymophila squamata
Scaled Antbird
Drymophila squamata stictocorypha
Folha Seca, Ubatuba, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Male. Another beautiful antbird of the Atlantic Forest. This one is found only in lower elevations and is endemic to Brazil. (S7)


Streak-headed Antbird - Drymophila striaticeps
Streak-headed Antbird
Drymophila striaticeps
Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador
Male. Formerly called Long-tailed Antbird, but that species has been split four ways (SACC proposal 542). Streak-headed Antbird is the most widespread of them, occuring in the Andes from central Colombia to Bolivia. (S8)


Streak-headed Antbird - Drymophila striaticeps
Streak-headed Antbird
Drymophila striaticeps
Tandayapa Valley, Pichincha province, Ecuador
Female. (S8)


Imeri Warbling-Antbird - Hypocnemis flavescens
Imeri Warbling-Antbird
Hypocnemis flavescens
Mitú, Vaupés department, Colombia.
Male. One of the Warbling Antbird splits; it occurs in eastern Colombia, southern Venezuela, and northwestern Brazil. It is extremely similar to the next species, having some very subtle vocal differences. Based on a few tests, it also responded just fine to playback of peruviana, making me doubt that it should really be considered a separate species. (S6)


Peruvian Warbling-Antbird - Hypocnemis peruviana
Peruvian Warbling-Antbird
Hypocnemis peruviana saturata
Yasuní Research Station, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Female. The Warbling Antbird has now been split into six species. Peruvian Warbling-Antbird is the one in the eastern Amazon. Ref: Isler, Morton L., Isler, Phyllis R. and Whitney, Bret M. 2007. Species limits in antbirds (Thamnophilidae): The Warbling Antbird (Hypocnemis cantator) complex. The Auk, 124(1): 11-28. Also see SACC proposal 299. (S6)


White-backed Fire-eye - Pyriglena leuconota
White-backed Fire-eye
Pyriglena leuconota pacifica
Río Ayampe, Manabí province, Ecuador.
Male. (S8)


Fringe-backed Fire-eye - Pyriglena atra
Fringe-backed Fire-eye
Pyriglena atra
Santa Luzia de Itanhy, Sergipe state, Brazil.
Male. This endangered species has a tiny range in the few remaining forest patches near the coast in northeastern Bahia and Sergipe in Brazil. (S6)


White-shouldered Fire-eye - Pyriglena leucoptera
White-shouldered Fire-eye
Pyriglena leucoptera
Parque Estadual Intervales, São Paulo state, Brazil.
Male. Normally a very skulking, hard-to-see species. I have no idea what possessed this one to sit in the open for five minutes... (D3)


Black-spotted Bare-eye - Phlegopsis nigromaculata
Black-spotted Bare-eye
Phlegopsis nigromaculata nigromaculata
Yasuní NP, Orellana province, Ecuador.
Male. This is normally an incredibly shy bird, hard enough to get even a glimpse of, never mind digiscope. This guy perched for several minutes, giving me time to set the scope up in just the right place to get him through a gap in the leaves. Notice the spider web on his face; he must have just flown straight through a web, which has to be a pretty unpleasant experience for a bird (and fatal for the smallest ones). (D3)



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